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When i disable query cache in mysql, queries still cached. As I understand it is because of OS filesystem cache. How can i prevent filesystem on cache this data. I working on WIndows 7 but it might be the Linux.

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How do you know anything is cached, and what is the problem with that? Please provide specifics. –  Henning Feb 8 '10 at 12:17
    
I running query mysql> SHOW GLOBAL STATUS LIKE 'Qcache%'; And it returns all zero values, and it means no query cache enabled. Next a running query against table with 20.000 rows mysql> SELECT COUNT() FROM bigtable; returns 1 row in set (2.55 sec) run again mysql> SELECT COUNT() FROM bigtable; returns 1 row in set (0.52 sec) etc --- I won't like to use cache because i need to run same queries for benchmarking. –  Dima Feb 8 '10 at 14:12

4 Answers 4

There is no query filesystem cache in MySQL.

When i disable query cache in mysql, queries still cached

How do you disable it and how do you know queries are still cached? Why you don't want them to be cached?

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I running query mysql> SHOW GLOBAL STATUS LIKE 'Qcache%'; And it returns all zero values, and it means no query cache enabled. Next a running query against table with 20.000 rows mysql> SELECT COUNT() FROM bigtable; returns 1 row in set (2.55 sec) run again mysql> SELECT COUNT() FROM bigtable; returns 1 row in set (0.52 sec) etc --- I won't like to use cache because i need to run same queries for benchmarking. –  Dima Feb 8 '10 at 14:13
    
When you make COUNT(*) on ISAM tables, only table header is read. Actual row count is stored in table header and fetched quickly. And it is cached in Windows file cache. This has no relation to query cache. –  FractalizeR Feb 8 '10 at 16:00
    
Well, count(*) is not good example. I use InnoDb table, and query might be select * or select id or whatever else. –  Dima Feb 8 '10 at 16:18
    
I think you misunderstand something. There is a lot of optimizations done by MySQL except query cache. And the single fact, that second same query is executed faster than the first, does not mean query cache is enabled. Also, I still don't understand why to disable it. Benchmarking should use the same conditions live server will have. Otherwise, why to have them at all? –  FractalizeR Feb 9 '10 at 7:58
SET SESSION query_cache_type = OFF;
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well now i can answer my question by myself. To prevent caching second and next queries need to set innodb_buffer_pool_size=0 config option. This buffer used by mysql to swapping data into memory and all next queries operates with memory instead HD.

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You need buffer pool a bit (say 10%) larger than your data (total size of Innodb TableSpaces) because it does not only contain data pages – it also contain adaptive hash indexes, insert buffer, locks which also take some time. Though it is not as critical – for most workloads if you will have your Innodb Buffer Pool 10% less than your database size you would not loose much anyway

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