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I am searching for a SQL Script that can be used to determine if there is any data (i.e. row count) in any of the tables of a given database.

The idea is to re-incarnate the database in case there are any rows existing (in any of the database).

The database being spoken of is Microsoft SQL SERVER.

Could someone suggest a sample script?

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13 Answers 13

up vote 62 down vote accepted

The following SQL will get you the row count of all tables in a database:

CREATE TABLE #counts
(
    table_name varchar(255),
    row_count int
)

EXEC sp_MSForEachTable @command1='INSERT #counts (table_name, row_count) SELECT ''?'', COUNT(*) FROM ?'
SELECT table_name, row_count FROM #counts ORDER BY table_name, row_count DESC

The output will be a list of tables and their row counts.

If you just want the total row count across the whole database, appending:

SELECT SUM(row_count) AS total_row_count FROM #counts

will get you a single value for the total number of rows in the whole database.

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great, works as described (though takes a while), also good as I'm not allowed to run the reports, thanks –  adolf garlic Aug 24 '11 at 9:58
10  
remember to add DROP TABLE #counts at the end of the commands –  balexandre Jan 7 '13 at 0:43
    
Have upvoted this - but think it important to mention that sp_MSForEachTable is an undocumented proc - afaik, this means that MS does not support it and may remove it from future versions without notice? –  MarkD Jun 26 at 8:04
    
@MarkD Yes, that is correct, although it has been there for several versions of SQL Server without change. –  adrianbanks Jun 27 at 20:48
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If you want to by pass the time and resources it takes to count(*) your 3million row tables. Try this per SQL SERVER Central by Kendal Van Dyke.


Row Counts Using sysindexes If you're using SQL 2000 you'll need to use sysindexes like so:

-- Shows all user tables and row counts for the current database 
-- Remove OBJECTPROPERTY function call to include system objects 
SELECT o.NAME,
  i.rowcnt 
FROM sysindexes AS i
  INNER JOIN sysobjects AS o ON i.id = o.id 
WHERE i.indid < 2  AND OBJECTPROPERTY(o.id, 'IsMSShipped') = 0
ORDER BY o.NAME

If you're using SQL 2005 or 2008 querying sysindexes will still work but Microsoft advises that sysindexes may be removed in a future version of SQL Server so as a good practice you should use the DMVs instead, like so:

-- Shows all user tables and row counts for the current database 
-- Remove is_ms_shipped = 0 check to include system objects 
-- i.index_id < 2 indicates clustered index (1) or hash table (0) 
SELECT o.name,
  ddps.row_count 
FROM sys.indexes AS i
  INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o ON i.OBJECT_ID = o.OBJECT_ID
  INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS ddps ON i.OBJECT_ID = ddps.OBJECT_ID
  AND i.index_id = ddps.index_id 
WHERE i.index_id < 2  AND o.is_ms_shipped = 0 ORDER BY o.NAME 
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1  
@djangofan any error messages? –  Keng Nov 15 '11 at 13:43
1  
@Keng You saved my life with the SQL2000 example. Worked like a charm. –  JClaspill Mar 12 '12 at 17:25
1  
@djangofan Both Keng's queries work in SQL Server 2008 R2. –  Sheen Oct 4 '12 at 8:37
3  
On my database, the accepted answer takes 10 seconds. This answer takes 0! +1 for you Keng. Though I did add JOIN sys.schemas s ON s.schema_id = o.schema_id and included s.Name to see the qualified table names. –  Bernhard Hofmann Sep 19 '13 at 9:25
1  
Note that using sysindexes or dm_dp_partition_stats will give you an approximation of the number of rows! –  krisku Oct 2 '13 at 10:09
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This one looks better than the others I think.

USE  [enter your db name here]
GO

SELECT      SCHEMA_NAME(A.schema_id) + '.' +
        A.Name, SUM(B.rows) AS 'RowCount'
FROM        sys.objects A
INNER JOIN sys.partitions B ON A.object_id = B.object_id
WHERE       A.type = 'U'
GROUP BY    A.schema_id, A.Name
GO
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1  
+1: this query just requires data_reader permissions. –  Jon of All Trades Jun 5 at 18:09
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SQL Server 2005 or later gives quite a nice report showing table sizes - including row counts etc. It's in Standard Reports - and it is Disc Usage by Table.

Programmatically, there's a nice solution at: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/67624/

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Don’t use SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TABLENAME option as this is a resource incentive operation. Once should use SQL Server Dynamic Management Views or System Catalogs to get the row count information for all tables in a database.

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I would make a minor change to Frederik's solution. I would use the sp_spaceused system stored procedure which will also include data and index sizes.


declare c_tables cursor fast_forward for 
select table_name from information_schema.tables 

open c_tables 
declare @tablename varchar(255) 
declare @stmt nvarchar(2000) 
declare @rowcount int 
fetch next from c_tables into @tablename 

while @@fetch_status = 0 
begin 

    select @stmt = 'sp_spaceused ' + @tablename 

    exec sp_executesql @stmt

    fetch next from c_tables into @tablename 

end 

close c_tables 
deallocate c_tables 

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SELECT 
    sc.name +'.'+ ta.name TableName, SUM(pa.rows) RowCnt
FROM 
    sys.tables ta
INNER JOIN sys.partitions pa
    ON pa.OBJECT_ID = ta.OBJECT_ID
INNER JOIN sys.schemas sc
    ON ta.schema_id = sc.schema_id
WHERE ta.is_ms_shipped = 0 AND pa.index_id IN (1,0)
GROUP BY sc.name,ta.name
ORDER BY SUM(pa.rows) DESC
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Short and sweet

sp_MSForEachTable 'DECLARE @t AS VARCHAR(MAX); 
SELECT @t = CAST(COUNT(1) as VARCHAR(MAX)) 
+ CHAR(9) + CHAR(9) + ''?'' FROM ? ; PRINT @t'

Output:

enter image description here

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select all rows from the information_schema.tables view, and issue a count(*) statement for each entry that has been returned from that view.

declare c_tables cursor fast_forward for
select table_name from information_schema.tables

open c_tables
declare @tablename varchar(255)
declare @stmt nvarchar(2000)
declare @rowcount int
fetch next from c_tables into @tablename

while @@fetch_status = 0
begin

    select @stmt = 'select @rowcount = count(*) from ' + @tablename

    exec sp_executesql @stmt, N'@rowcount int output', @rowcount=@rowcount OUTPUT

    print N'table: ' + @tablename + ' has ' + convert(nvarchar(1000),@rowcount) + ' rows'

    fetch next from c_tables into @tablename

end

close c_tables
deallocate c_tables
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Here's a dynamic SQL approach that also gives you the schema as well:

DECLARE @sql nvarchar(MAX)

SELECT
    @sql = COALESCE(@sql + ' UNION ALL ', '') +
        'SELECT
            ''' + s.name + ''' AS ''Schema'',
            ''' + t.name + ''' AS ''Table'',
            COUNT(*) AS Count
            FROM ' + QUOTENAME(s.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(t.name)
    FROM sys.schemas s
    INNER JOIN sys.tables t ON t.schema_id = s.schema_id
    ORDER BY
        s.name,
        t.name

EXEC(@sql)

If needed, it would be trivial to extend this to run over all databases in the instance (join to sys.databases).

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This is my favorite solution for SQL 2008 , which puts the results into a "TEST" temp table that I can use to sort and get the results that I need :

SET NOCOUNT ON 
DBCC UPDATEUSAGE(0) 
DROP TABLE #t;
CREATE TABLE #t 
( 
[name] NVARCHAR(128),
[rows] CHAR(11),
reserved VARCHAR(18), 
data VARCHAR(18), 
index_size VARCHAR(18),
unused VARCHAR(18)
) ;
INSERT #t EXEC sp_msForEachTable 'EXEC sp_spaceused ''?''' 
SELECT * INTO TEST FROM #t;
DROP TABLE #t;
SELECT  name, [rows], reserved, data, index_size, unused FROM TEST \
WHERE ([rows] > 0) AND (name LIKE 'XXX%')
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    SELECT
          SUM(sdmvPTNS.row_count) AS [DBRows]
    FROM
          sys.objects AS sOBJ
          INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats AS sdmvPTNS
                ON sOBJ.object_id = sdmvPTNS.object_id
    WHERE 
          sOBJ.type = 'U'
          AND sOBJ.is_ms_shipped = 0
          AND sdmvPTNS.index_id < 2
    GO
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Works on Azure, doesn't require stored procs.

SELECT t.name, s.row_count from sys.tables t
JOIN sys.dm_db_partition_stats s
ON t.object_id = s.object_id
AND t.type_desc = 'USER_TABLE'
AND t.name not like '%dss%'
AND s.index_id = 1

Credit: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/arunrakwal/archive/2012/04/09/sql-azure-list-of-tables-with-record-count.aspx

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