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I have an assignment at school and I have to display the correct change for an amount that is being input by the user that is less than 1.00 but greater than 0. Every amount works except anything in a double digit that has a 1 or a 6 on the tenth spot. for example .11, .16, .21, .26 etc.

this is my code

import java.util.Scanner;

public class AmountChange
{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      //
      double amt; 
      int cents, quarter, dime, nickle, penny;

      Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

      //To get the users input
      System.out.println("Change in Coins");
      System.out.println("---------------");
      System.out.println("Enter the amount less than $1.00, " +
                         "\nbut more than zero.");
      System.out.print("\nEnter amount: ");
      amt = keyboard.nextDouble();

      //Loop for incorrect input
      while ( amt < 0 || amt > 1.00 )
      {
         System.out.println("Please enter the amount less than $1.00,"  
                           + "\nbut more than zero.");
         System.out.print("\nRe-enter amount: ");
         amt = keyboard.nextDouble();
      }

      // 
      cents = (int)( amt * 100 + .1 );

      quarter = cents/25;
      cents %= 25;

      dime = cents/10;
      cents %= 10;

      nickle = cents/5;
      cents %= 5;

      penny = cents;

      // ----------------------------------------------------------
      if (quarter > 1)
      {
         System.out.print("\nYou will need " + quarter + " quarters, ");
      }
      else if (quarter == 1)
      {
         System.out.print("\nYou will need " + quarter + " quarter ,");
      }
      else 
      {
         System.out.print("\nYou will need no quarters, ");
      }

      // ----------------------------------------------------------
      if (dime > 1)
      {
         System.out.print(dime + " dimes, ");
      }
      else if (dime == 1)
      {
         System.out.print(dime + " dime, ");
      }
      else 
      {
         System.out.print("no dimes, ");
      }

      // ----------------------------------------------------------
      if (nickle > 1)
      {
         System.out.print(nickle + " nickles, ");
      }
      else if (nickle == 1)
      {
         System.out.print(nickle + " nickle, ");
      }
      else 
      {
         System.out.print("no nickles, ");
      }

      // ----------------------------------------------------------
      if (penny > 1)
      {
         System.out.print("and " + penny + " pennies.");
      }
      else if (quarter == 1)
      {
         System.out.print("and " + penny + " penny.");
      }
      else 
      {
         System.out.print("and no pennies.");
      }      
   }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Ah, the joys of cut and paste :-)

if (penny > 1)
{
    System.out.print("and " + penny + " pennies.");
}
else if (quarter == 1)  // <<<<< LOOK HERE !!!
{
     System.out.print("and " + penny + " penny.");
}
else 
{
     System.out.print("and no pennies.");
}      

That should be penny, not quarter.

And, in fact, it actually does work for .26 (despite your assertion) since quarter is set to 1, the same as penny. In fact it'll work for any value where the number of quarters equals the number of pennies (.26, .52, .78), but only by accident.


As an aside, one other thing you may want to think about is refactoring all that repeated code with something like:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Test
{
    static double getAmount(Scanner keyboard) {
        System.out.println("Enter the amount between zero and $1.00.");
        System.out.print("\nEnter amount: ");
        return keyboard.nextDouble();
    }

    static String mkeTxt (int val, String prefix, String singular, String plural) {
        if (val == 0)
            return prefix + "no " + plural;
        if (val == 1)
            return prefix + "1 " + singular;
        return prefix + val + " " + plural;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        double amt; 
        int cents, quarter, dime, nickle, penny;

        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.println("Change in Coins");
        System.out.println("---------------");
        amt = getAmount(keyboard);
        while ( amt < 0 || amt > 1.00 )
            amt = getAmount(keyboard);

        cents = (int)( amt * 100 + .1 );
        quarter = cents/25;
        cents %= 25;
        dime = cents/10;
        cents %= 10;
        nickle = cents/5;
        cents %= 5;
        penny = cents;

        System.out.print("\nYou will need ");
        System.out.print(mkeTxt(quarter,"", "quarter", "quarters"));
        System.out.print(mkeTxt(dime,", ", "dime", "dimes"));
        System.out.print(mkeTxt(nickle,", ", "nickle", "nickles"));
        System.out.print(mkeTxt(penny," and ", "penny", "pennies"));
        System.out.println(".");
    }
}

The use of a function to output the prompt and accept input makes the user input code a little easier to maintain as you only need to change interaction in one place.

The real saver is the mkTxt() function to give you a string that auto-magically adjusts to the quantity of coins. It gets rid of that voluminous group of if/then/else blocks in main(), aiding readability somewhat.

If you ever find yourself doing a similar thing many times but with different values, that positively cries out to be changed into a function or loop of some description.

share|improve this answer

You just have a simple typo! Change:

else if (quarter == 1){
    System.out.print("and " + penny + " penny.");
} else {
    System.out.print("and no pennies.");
}

To,

else if (penny == 1){
    System.out.print("and " + penny + " penny.");
} else {
    System.out.print("and no pennies.");
}
share|improve this answer

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