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I need to port an application that uses Oracle mod_plsql to PostgreSQL. Currently database procedures are called over HTTP with the use of Apache + mod_plsql. The procedures are easily ported to PostgreSQL, but I can not find a replacement for the Apache + mod_plsql part. Does anybody have any experience on ho to do it and what to use?

UPDATE (to make stuff more clear):

See: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B14099_19/web.1012/b14010/concept.htm for how mod_plsql work.

What I need is a way to call a function on postgrsql as:

protocol://hostname[:port]/DAD_location/[[!][schema.][package.]proc_name[?query_string]]

ei:

http://www.acme.com:9000/pls/mydad/mypackage.myproc?a=v&b=1

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Er, what? So the PL/SQL procedures generate HTML directly? I suspect you're going to need a thin wrapper in a scripting language to meet your needs - I'd use (say) a Python script that used path_info / query params to determine which procedure to run and what params to send it and streamed the result back to the client. Replace "python script" with your preferred tool. –  Craig Ringer Mar 6 '14 at 12:42
    
A thin wrapper is not an option. (see my question with edit) –  sofist Mar 6 '14 at 13:08
    
I suspect you'll have to write a mod_plpgsql or port mod_plsql then. Though I don't see why a wrapper is a problem, it's effectively the same thing. –  Craig Ringer Mar 6 '14 at 13:47

1 Answer 1

You could fork my NodeJS based implementation of mod_plsql nodeplsql as a starting point and "simply" replace the Oracle access with PostgreeSQL. You should be able to use pretty much all of the logic in NodeJS and only need to change the way how the code interacts with the database in the oracle.js module. Please keep me posted, if you go this way.

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