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Here is minimal code for issue demonstration: http://pastebin.com/5TXDpSh5

#!/bin/bash
set -e
set -o pipefail

function echoTraps() {
    echo "= on start:"
    trap -p
    trap -- 'echo func-EXIT' EXIT
    echo "= after set new:"
    trap -p
    # we can ensure after script done - file '/tmp/tmp.txt' was not created
    trap -- 'echo SIG 1>/tmp/tmp.txt' SIGPIPE SIGHUP SIGINT SIGQUIT SIGTERM
}

trap -- 'echo main-EXIT1' EXIT

echo "===== subshell trap"
( echoTraps; )

echo "===== pipe trap"
echoTraps | cat

echo "===== done everything"

output

===== subshell trap
= on start:
= after set new:
trap -- 'echo func-EXIT' EXIT
func-EXIT
===== pipe trap
= on start:
= after set new:
trap -- 'echo func-EXIT' EXIT
===== done everything
main-EXIT1

expected output

===== subshell trap
= on start:
= after set new:
trap -- 'echo func-EXIT' EXIT
func-EXIT
===== pipe trap
= on start:
= after set new:
trap -- 'echo func-EXIT' EXIT
func-EXIT                 <---- here is the expected difference
===== done everything
main-EXIT1

NB: i tested for OSX 10.9.2 bash (3.2.51) - other versions of bash has same difference between actual an expected output, and described bellow

share|improve this question
    
Nice question. I suspect a race condition between when the two sides of the pipeline exit, but I can't quite put my finger on it. – chepner Mar 6 '14 at 13:48
    
Looks like a bash bug to me. You may want to report it upstream. – user2719058 Mar 6 '14 at 15:45

Here are some more test cases for your amusement:

$ cat traps.sh
#!/bin/bash

echoTraps() {
        echo "entering echoTraps()"

        printf "  traps: %s\n" "$(trap -p)"

        echo "  setting trap"
        trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT

        printf "  traps: %s\n" "$(trap -p)"

        echo "exiting echoTraps()"
}

trap -- 'echo "main-exit()"' EXIT

echo "===== calling '( echoTraps; )'"
( echoTraps; )
echo

echo "===== calling 'echoTraps | cat'"
echoTraps | cat
echo

echo "===== calling '( echoTraps; ) | cat'"
( echoTraps; ) | cat
echo

echo "===== calling '{ echoTraps; } | cat'"
{ echoTraps; } | cat
echo

bash-4.2.25(1)

$ ./traps.sh
===== calling '( echoTraps; )'
entering echoTraps()
  traps:
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()
func-exit()

===== calling 'echoTraps | cat'
entering echoTraps()
  traps: trap -- 'echo "main-exit()"' EXIT
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()

===== calling '( echoTraps; ) | cat'
entering echoTraps()
  traps:
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()
func-exit()

===== calling '{ echoTraps; } | cat'
entering echoTraps()
  traps: trap -- 'echo "main-exit()"' EXIT
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()

main-exit()

bash-4.3.0(1)

$ bash-static-4.3.2/bin/bash-static traps.sh
===== calling '( echoTraps; )'
entering echoTraps()
  traps:
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()
func-exit()

===== calling 'echoTraps | cat'
entering echoTraps()
  traps: trap -- 'echo "main-exit()"' EXIT
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()

===== calling '( echoTraps; ) | cat'
entering echoTraps()
  traps:
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()
func-exit()

===== calling '{ echoTraps; } | cat'
entering echoTraps()
  traps: trap -- 'echo "main-exit()"' EXIT
  setting trap
  traps: trap -- 'echo "func-exit()"' EXIT
exiting echoTraps()
func-exit()

main-exit()

Bottom line: Don't rely on edge-cases like this. I remember investigating other inconsistencies (not about traps) with regards to subshells and pipes and tried to wrap my head around the bash source code and you don't want to go down that route and try to understand why it behaves like it does in certain situations (the code is really horrible, btw). As you can see, some things seem to have been "fixed" and/but both my examples already behave differently than yours.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for investigating. I used other version of bash - so i have updated my question. Anyway your example has same difference between actual and expected output for echoTraps | cat case – Speakus Mar 6 '14 at 16:05

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