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I have a string below string i am using regular expression but nothing is working:

use strict;
use warnings;
my $var ="\\\\abc\\cde\\pqs\\some";
my $var1 = s/\\/\/;

$var =~ s/$var/$var1/;

print "$var\n";

Purpose is all the double backslash need to change with single backslash.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use warnings;

my $var ="\\\\abc\\cde\\pqs\\some";
$var =~ s|\\{2}|\\|g;

print "$var\n";
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You're assigning a regex to $var1 and then put that into the replacement part of another regex - This can't work. Besides, the regex needs to use the g modifier to replace all matches, not only the first one.

use strict;
use warnings;
my $var ="\\\\abc\\cde\\pqs\\some";
$var =~ s/\\\\/\\/g;

print "$var\n";
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use strict;
use warnings;
my $var = "\\\\abc\\cde\\pqs\\some";

$var =~ s/\\{2}/\\/g;

print "$var\n";
share|improve this answer

To replace two blackslashes with one, you can use this simple regular expression:

$var =~ s/\\\\/\\/g;

This will do the conversation, but the result will probably not what you expected.

I think what you actually tried to do is this:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

my $demo = "\\\\\\\\abc\\\\cde\\\\pqs\\\\some";
$demo =~ s/(^|[^\\])\\{2}($|[^\\])/$1\\$2/g;
$demo =~ s/(^|[^\\])\\{4}($|[^\\])/$1\\\\$2/g;
print "Result: $demo\n";

I think you had an escaped string, containing backlashes, like the following example:

\\\\server\\path\\path\\path

And you would like to transform it into this:

\\server\path\path\path

Then you have to use the "two step" regular expression shown in my example above.


Explanation of the Regular Expresion

First at all, it is a "search/replace" regular expression:

s/.../.../g

The g at the end means "global matching". This actually means, after the first match and replacement, the string is further searched for more matches until all matches were found and replaced. The way how this works, is why the regular expression in my example is probably hand to understand:

If we have a string like this:

heeeello

And you apply a regular expression like this:

s/ee/e/g

You actually get this result:

hello

This, because the ee matches several times. In the following example for illustration, I write the matched characters in uppercase:

hEEeello  -> hEeello
hEEello   -> hEello
hEEllo    -> hEllo
no match left.

This is the reason for the extra bits in my regular expressions. In the first one, I search for places with exactly 2 backslashes and replace them with one. In the second regular expression I search for places with exactly 4 backslashes and replace them with two.

Let us have a look at the search part:

(^|[^\\])\\{2}($|[^\\])
  • (^|[^\\]) This is actually a capturing group (...|...). Actually it matches either ^=the beginning of the text, or [^\\] not a backslash character.

  • \\{2} This matches exactly {2} two backslash characters.

  • ($|[^\\]) This is similar to the first group. It means: Match either $ = the end of the text, or [^\\] = not a backslash character.

The second regular expression is similar, but it uses \\{4} to match exactly four backslashes.

This [^\\] match not a backslash character parts are necessary to avoid the behaviour shown in the "hello" example above.

This example string:

\\\\\\\\\\\\\a

Simple wouldn't match.

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Hi Flovdis .. can you please explain your regx if possible because i am not able to get it .It will be really help full for me. thanks –  Maverick Mar 7 '14 at 11:55
    
Sure, I will edit my answer and add an explanation. –  Flovdis Mar 7 '14 at 13:41
    
Ok, edited the answer with an additional explanation. –  Flovdis Mar 7 '14 at 14:01
    
I fixed a problem. It should be (?= and not (?: –  Flovdis Mar 7 '14 at 14:13
    
Thanks a Lot Flovdis for such a nice explanation.It helps me a lot :) –  Maverick Mar 7 '14 at 17:41

There is actually a more complex but simpler solution:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

my $demo = "\\\\\\\\abc\\\\cde\\\\pqs\\\\some";
$demo =~ s/(?:^|[^\\])(\\+)(?:$|[^\\])/{'\\' x (length("$1")\/2)}/ge;
print "Result: $demo\n";

This is using an expression in the replacement section which just divides the number of found backslash characters by 2.

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