Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

template <typename T>
inline T const& max (T const& a, T const& b)
{
    return  a < b  ?  b : a;
}

inline char const* max (char const* a, char const* b)
{ 
    return  std::strcmp(a,b) < 0  ?  b : a;
}

template <typename T>
inline T const& max (T const& a, T const& b, T const& c)
{
    return max (max(a,b), c);  // error
}

int main ()
{
    ::max(7, 42, 68);     // OK

    const char* s1 = "frederic";
    const char* s2 = "anica";
    const char* s3 = "lucas";
    ::max(s1, s2, s3);    // ERROR

}

Could anybody please tell me why this is an error?

share|improve this question
2  
Please post the actual error you're seeing, not just "ERROR"? –  Binary Worrier Feb 8 '10 at 15:41
    
...especially when the program is well-formed and should compile. –  avakar Feb 8 '10 at 15:43
    
By the way, templates are inline by default, so on the 1st and 3rd function you can remove the keyword. –  GManNickG Feb 8 '10 at 15:44
1  
@GMan and #phresnel - I'm afraid you're both wrong. You don't need inline in front of your templates: they will link just fine. But at the same time, you DO have to annotate them as inline if you want to hint at the compiler that they should be optimized. –  Manuel Feb 8 '10 at 15:55
1  
@GMan, the standard does differentiate between inline function template and non-inline function template. However, even non-inline templates are allowed to be defined in multiple translation units, so there is absolutely no difference whatsoever between these types of function templates as far as the standard is concerned. And as you correctly pointed out, for quite a long time now, compilers don't differentiate between them either. –  avakar Feb 8 '10 at 16:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you say:

 max (max(a,b), c)

max(char*,char*) returns a pointer BY VALUE. You then return a reference to this value. To make this work, you should make all your max() functions return values rather than references, as I think was suggested in an answer to your previous question, or make the char* overload take and return references to pointers.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Neil: Wouldn't it be better to have string version use const& in the parameters? –  GManNickG Feb 8 '10 at 15:41

You're returning a reference to a temporary. The char* overload of max returns by value, but the 3-arg template returns by reference.

I don't know exactly why you get an error. I only get a warning on my compiler (GCC). I imagine if you posted the error text, though, someone could figure it out.

share|improve this answer
    
@Steve: Maybe warnings as errors, I only get a warning too in MSVC++. –  GManNickG Feb 8 '10 at 15:40
    
@GMan, yes, for instance in GCC with -Werror, the message "warnings being treated as errors" would be a clue ;-) –  Steve Jessop Feb 8 '10 at 15:54

If you really want to return a reference, then you have to modify the second overload to return a reference too.

char const* const & max (char const* const & a, char const* const & b)
share|improve this answer
    
A typedef helps here too: typedef const char* cstring; inline const cstring& max(const cstring& a, const cstring& b) –  GManNickG Feb 8 '10 at 15:42

Your example is equivalent to this, maybe you'll see it better this way:

int foo()
{
    return 0;
}

int const & bar()
{
    return foo(); // Reference to what???
}
share|improve this answer

When compiling, I get:

maxtest.cpp: In function `const T& max(const T&, const T&, const T&) [with T = const char*]':
maxtest.cpp:29:   instantiated from here
maxtest.cpp:19: warning: returning reference to temporary

That would be because you're returning a reference to a temporary (i.e. your object no longer exists by the time the caller of the function can check its value). This is certainly a bug but, since you said error, I suspect it isn't the bug you meant.

Some of the headers in Visual Studio #define min and max. To get around that, put parentheses around min and max:

return (max) ( (max) (a, b), c );
share|improve this answer

gcc 4.2.1 gives a warning about returning reference to a temporary, so, changing your code to return by value helps.

BTW: I also renamed max to my_max, since max is already defined in <algorithm>

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

template <typename T>
inline T const my_max (T const& a, T const& b)
{
    return  a < b  ?  b : a;
}

inline char const* my_max (char const* a, char const* b)
{
    return  std::strcmp(a,b) < 0  ?  b : a;
}

template <typename T>
inline T const my_max (T const& a, T const& b, T const& c)
{
    return my_max (my_max(a,b), c);  // error
}

int main ()
{
    std::cout << my_max(7, 42, 68) << "\n"; // OK

    const char* s1 = "frederic";
    const char* s2 = "anica";
    const char* s3 = "lucas";
    std::cout << my_max(s1, s2, s3) << "\n"; // NO ERROR

}

gcc -Wall -Wextra file.cpp -o test gives no warnings or errors, output is:

68
lucas

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.