Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A while back I asked a question about TransactionScope escalating to MSDTC when I wasn't expecting it to. (Previous question)

What it boiled down to was, in SQL2005, in order to use a TransactionScope, you can only instance and open a single SqlConnection within the life of the TransactionScope. With SQL2008, you can instance multiple SqlConnections, but only a single one can be open at any given time. SQL2000 will always escalate to DTC...we don't support SQL2000 in our application, a WinForms app, BTW.

Our solution to single-connection-only problem was to create a TransactionScope helper class, called LocalTransactionScope (aka 'LTS'). It wraps a TransactionScope and, most importantly, creates and maintains a single SqlConnection instance for our application. The good news is, it works - we can use LTS across disparate pieces of code and they all join the ambient transaction. Very nice. The trouble is, every root LTS instance created will create and effectively kill a connection from the connection pool. By 'Effectively Kill' I mean it will instance a SqlConnetion, which will open a new connection (for whatever reason, it never reuses a connection from the pool,) and when that root LTS is disposed, it closes and disposes the SqlConnection which is supposed to release the connection back to the pool so that it can be reused, however, it clearly never is reused. The pool bloats until it's maxed out, and then the application fails when a max-pool-size+1 connection is established.

Below I've attached a stripped down version of the LTS code and a sample console application class that will demonstrate the connection pool exhaustion. In order to watch your connection pool bloat, use SQL Server Managment Studio's 'Activity Monitor' or this query:

SELECT DB_NAME(dbid) as 'DB Name',
COUNT(dbid) as 'Connections'
FROM sys.sysprocesses WITH (nolock)
WHERE dbid > 0
GROUP BY dbid

I'm attaching LTS here, and a sample console application that you can use to demonstrate for yourself that it will consume connections from the pool and never re-use nor release them. You will need to add a reference to System.Transactions.dll for LTS to compile.

Things to note: It's the root-level LTS that opens and closes the SqlConnection, which always opens a new connection in the pool. Having nested LTS instances makes no difference because only the root LTS instance establishes a SqlConnection. As you can see, the connection string is always the same, so it should be reusing the connections.

Is there some arcane condition we're not meeting that causes the connections not to be re-used? Is there any solution to this other than turning pooling off entirely?

public sealed class LocalTransactionScope : IDisposable
{
      private static SqlConnection _Connection;    

      private TransactionScope _TransactionScope;
      private bool _IsNested;    

      public LocalTransactionScope(string connectionString)
      {
         // stripped out a few cases that need to throw an exception
         _TransactionScope = new TransactionScope();

         // we'll use this later in Dispose(...) to determine whether this LTS instance should close the connection.
         _IsNested = (_Connection != null);

         if (_Connection == null)
         {
            _Connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString);

            // This Has Code-Stink.  You want to open your connections as late as possible and hold them open for as little
            // time as possible.  However, in order to use TransactionScope with SQL2005 you can only have a single 
            // connection, and it can only be opened once within the scope of the entire TransactionScope.  If you have
            // more than one SqlConnection, or you open a SqlConnection, close it, and re-open it, it more than once, 
            // the TransactionScope will escalate to the MSDTC.  SQL2008 allows you to have multiple connections within a 
            // single TransactionScope, however you can only have a single one open at any given time. 
            // Lastly, let's not forget about SQL2000.  Using TransactionScope with SQL2000 will immediately and always escalate to DTC.
            // We've dropped support of SQL2000, so that's not a concern we have.
            _Connection.Open();
         }
      }

      /// <summary>'Completes' the <see cref="TransactionScope"/> this <see cref="LocalTransactionScope"/> encapsulates.</summary>
      public void Complete() { _TransactionScope.Complete(); }

      /// <summary>Creates a new <see cref="SqlCommand"/> from the current <see cref="SqlConnection"/> this <see cref="LocalTransactionScope"/> is managing.</summary>
      public SqlCommand CreateCommand() { return _Connection.CreateCommand(); }

      void IDisposable.Dispose() { this.Dispose(); }

      public void Dispose()
      {
          Dispose(true); GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
      }

      private void Dispose(bool disposing)
      {
         if (disposing)
         {
            _TransactionScope.Dispose();
            _TransactionScope = null;    

            if (!_IsNested)
            {
               // last one out closes the door, this would be the root LTS, the first one to be instanced.
               LocalTransactionScope._Connection.Close();
               LocalTransactionScope._Connection.Dispose();    

               LocalTransactionScope._Connection = null;
            }
         }
      }
   }

This is a Program.cs that will exhibit the connection pool exhaustion:

class Program
{
      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         // fill in your connection string, but don't monkey with any pooling settings, like
         // "Pooling=false;" or the "Max Pool Size" stuff.  Doesn't matter if you use 
         // Doesn't matter if you use Windows or SQL auth, just make sure you set a Data Soure and an Initial Catalog
         string connectionString = "your connection string here";

         List<string> randomTables = new List<string>();
         using (var nonLTSConnection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
         using (var command = nonLTSConnection.CreateCommand())
         {
             command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
             command.CommandText = @"SELECT [TABLE_NAME], NEWID() AS [ID]
                                    FROM [INFORMATION_SCHEMA].TABLES]
                                    WHERE [TABLE_SCHEMA] = 'dbo' and [TABLE_TYPE] = 'BASE TABLE'
                                    ORDER BY [ID]";

             nonLTSConnection.Open();
             using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
             {
                 while (reader.Read())
                 {
                     string table = (string)reader["TABLE_NAME"];
                     randomTables.Add(table);

                     if (randomTables.Count > 200) { break; } // got more than enough to test.
                 }
             }
             nonLTSConnection.Close();
         }    

         // we're going to assume your database had some tables.
         for (int j = 0; j < 200; j++)
         {
             // At j = 100 you'll see it pause, and you'll shortly get an InvalidOperationException with the text of:
             // "Timeout expired.  The timeout period elapsed prior to obtaining a connection from the pool.  
             // This may have occurred because all pooled connections were in use and max pool size was reached."

             string tableName = randomTables[j % randomTables.Count];

             Console.Write("Creating root-level LTS " + j.ToString() + " selecting from " + tableName);
             using (var scope = new LocalTransactionScope(connectionString))
             using (var command = scope.CreateCommand())
             {
                 command.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                 command.CommandText = "SELECT TOP 20 * FROM [" + tableName + "]";
                 using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader())
                 {
                     while (reader.Read())
                     {
                         Console.Write(".");
                     }
                     Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);
                 }
             }

             Thread.Sleep(50);
             scope.Complete();
         }

         Console.ReadKey();
     }
 }
share|improve this question
    
I just ran through your code without any issues, and I only ever saw one connection to SQL. –  JoshBerke Feb 8 '10 at 16:35
2  
Why is _Connection static? That means it would open a single connection for all instances on a single end-user. Also, it appears that you never release the connection back to the pool so how could one be pulled from the pool? Am I misinterpreting your code? –  Cat Man Do Feb 8 '10 at 17:21
    
@Josh I wish I could say the same. 10 different developers exhaust the connection pool here in our office, and another developer friend of mine this code exhausts his connection pool as well. –  Yoopergeek Feb 8 '10 at 17:58
    
Nissan-Fan : The static connection is the entire point of LTS. Disparate pieces of code can instance an LTS in order to join an ambient transaction. Because of TransactionScope (TS) limitations, only a single SqlConnection may be instanced. Because disparate pieces of code need to partake in the global transaction but need to use a single connection, LTS wraps TS, and provides a single SqlConnection. When the first ('root') LTS is finally disposed, it closes/disposes/nulls the SqlConnection that it instanced. Escalation to MSDTC is avoided. –  Yoopergeek Feb 8 '10 at 18:17
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The expected TransactionScope/SqlConnection pattern is, according to MSDN:

using(TransactionScope scope = ...) {
  using (SqlConnection conn = ...) {
    conn.Open();
    SqlCommand.Execute(...);
    SqlCommand.Execute(...);
  }
  scope.Complete();
}

So in the MSDN example the conenction is disposed inside the scope, before the scope is complete. Your code though is different, it disposes the connection after the scope is complete. I'm not an expert in matters of TransactionScope and its interaction with the SqlConnection (I know some things, but your question goes pretty deep) and I can't find any specifications what is the correct pattern. But I'd suggest you revisit your code and dispose the singleton connection before the outermost scope is complete, similarly to the MSDN sample.

Also, I hope you do realize your code will fall apart the moment a second thread comes to play into your application.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the comment - I've had the nagging feeling in the back of the skull that because "doing TS weird" might be the cause of the problem. Let me try tweaking the dispose code to see if it makes a difference. For the most part, our app isn't doing anything DB-heavy enough that it requires us to thread the DB code, but what are you seeing that isn't thread-safe? ...besides the dispose code. ;) I should point out that in our actual IDiposable implementation more fleshed out and (I hope) thread-safe. We implement IDisposable more like this: copypastecode.com/21859 –  Yoopergeek Feb 8 '10 at 19:23
1  
Your code isn't thread safe 1) by design because multiple threads can have independent transaction scopes and they'll all share the one and unique sqlconnection and 2) by implementation because the constructor _IsNested and _connection check/allocation are not thread safe. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 8 '10 at 19:31
    
1) Absolutely right. . . Not much I can change about that. This being a WinForms client app, there's not as much concern with other threads coming in, and on 2) Oh man! Thanks for pointing that out. :) 1) still trumps the entire thing though. Also, unfortunately, the single SqlConnection is the reason we're in this mess - we have to only have a single SqlConnection otherwise TransactionScope will escalate to DTC far too easily. –  Yoopergeek Feb 8 '10 at 19:39
1  
OMG OMG OMG!!! You fixed it! Can I +5 your answer? What you described is exactly the problem. Because the root LTS is disposing of the transaction scope before it closes the connection somehow mangles the connection's usability in the connection pool. I was pulling the transaction scope out from underneath the connection's feet. Dude, thanks so much. –  Yoopergeek Feb 8 '10 at 20:06
3  
That's what I don't like about the whole TransactionScope/SqlConnection interaction throught the Framework: it works only when used exactly as the samples, as soon as one deviates just a tiny bit it goes haywire. The worst is that it doesn't fail graciously with meanigful and actionable error messages, it just start behaving odd and strange. –  Remus Rusanu Feb 8 '10 at 21:21
show 1 more comment

Is this code legal?

using(TransactionScope scope = ..)
{
    using (SqlConnection conn = ..)
    using (SqlCommand command = ..)
    {
        conn.Open();

        SqlCommand.Execute(..);
    }

    using (SqlConnection conn = ..) // the same connection string
    using (SqlCommand command = ..)
    {
        conn.Open();

        SqlCommand.Execute(..);
    }

    scope.Complete();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.