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If I have a class Car:

public class Car {

    int weight;
    Car(){}

    public Car(int weight) {
        this.weight = weight;
    }
}

and another class Sedan that inherits from Car:

 public class Sedan extends Car { 

     public Sedan(int weight) {
         super(weight);
     }
 }

and a third class Jeep that also inherits from Car:

public class Jeep extends Car {

    public Jeep(int weight) {
        super(weight);
    }
} 

How can I make it so that when I say Car mercedes = new Car(5000);

The constructor creates a new Jeep or a new Sedan depending on the given weight: if( weight>3000) , create a Jeep mercedes=new Jeep(weight); , else create a Sedan mercedes=new Sedan(weight); ?

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2  
Not within the constructor. What you need is a Factory. (A method that calls the respective constructor) –  Nathan Merrill Mar 6 at 16:11

3 Answers 3

It seems you want to use factory pattern. That means you create separate class, that's responsible to build and return respective Car object.

For example:

class CarFactory {
    public Car createCar(int weight) {
         if (weight < 3000) {
              return new Sedan(weight);
         } else {
              return new Jeep(weight);
         }
    }
}

Usage:

CarFactory carFactory = new CarFactory();
Car car = carFactory.createCar(yourDesiredWeight);

This not only helps you to solve problem but also helps you to organize your code in a better way. I.e. removes responsibility of creating car from class that will manipulate with class.

Note: I highly recommend you to read up on single responsibility principle (SRP, for short).

Note 2: It seems class Car needs to be abstract since it's general base class for all derived types and does not make sense if initialized directly (public abstract class Car {...}).

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I know about the factory pattern thing. I was wondering if it could be done directly in the constructor of Car. Thank You. –  user120404 Mar 6 at 16:46
    
@user120404 You can't change type of instantiated object and if ctor is invoked it means that object has been instantiated. –  Leri Mar 6 at 17:59

You can't do this like you want. What you're looking for is the Abstract Factory Pattern

    public abstract class AbstractCarFactory{
      public static Car createCar(int weight){
        Car ret=null;
          if (weight>3000) {
            car=new Jeep(weight);
          } else {
            car=new Sedan(weight);
          }
        return car;
      }
    } 

Add another option (that I don't recommend and is terrible form)

You could merge the factory pattern a delegation pattern:

public class Car {
    private Car car;
    protected Car() {

    }
    public Car(int weight) {
        if (weight>3000) {
            car=new Jeep(weight);
        } else {
            car=new Sedan(weight);
        }
    }
    public String getType() {
        return car.getType();
    }
}

The Car class will construct a Jeep or Sedan, and delegate all calls to it.

public class Jeep extends Car {
    int weight;

    public Jeep(int weight) {
        super();
        this.weight = weight;
    }
    public String getType() {
        return "JEEP";
    }
}

Again, this is really contrived and shouldn't be done.

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Please remember encapsulation!

public class Car{

    private int weight ;

    public Car(){

    }

   public Car(int weight){
       this.weight = weight; 
   }

}

If you want to instantiate a car just :

   Car someCar = new Car(Insert Weight Here);

You can make that call anywhere you want. This isn't how inheritance is usually used though. You may want to clarify a little more. Usually you do things like:

Car somecar = new Jeep(4000);

or

Car somecar = new Sedan (1000);

but they are all cars in the end of the day

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