Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to implement an algorithm using the ST monad and STUArrays, and I want it to be able to work with both Float and Double data.

I'll demonstrate on a simpler example problem: calculating a memoized scanl (+) 0 (I know it can be solved without STUArray, just using as example).

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts, ScopedTypeVariables #-}

import Control.Monad
import Control.Monad.ST
import Data.Array.Unboxed
import Data.Array.ST

accumST :: forall a. (IArray UArray a, Num a) => [a] -> Int -> a
accumST vals = (!) . runSTUArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: ST s (STUArray s Int a)
  forM_ (zip vals [1 .. length vals]) $ \(val, i) ->
    readArray arr (i - 1)
    >>= writeArray arr i . (+ val)
  return arr

This fails with:

Could not deduce (MArray (STUArray s) a (ST s)) from the context ()
  arising from a use of 'newArray'
Possible fix:
  add (MArray (STUArray s) a (ST s)) to the context of
    an expression type signature
  or add an instance declaration for (MArray (STUArray s) a (ST s))

I can't apply the suggested "Possible fix". Because I need to add something like (forall s. MArray (STUArray s) a (ST s)) to the context, but afaik that's impossible..

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unforunately, you can't currently create a context that requires that an unboxed array be available for a specific type. Quantified Constraints aren't allowed. However, you can still accomplish what you're trying to do, (with the added advantage of having type-specific code versions.) For Longer functions, you could try to split out common expressions so that the repeated code is as small as possible.

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts, ScopedTypeVariables #-}
module AccumST where 

import Control.Monad
import Control.Monad.ST
import Data.Array.Unboxed
import Data.Array.ST
import Data.Array.IArray

-- General one valid for all instances of Num.
-- accumST :: forall a. (IArray UArray a, Num a) => [a] -> Int -> a
accumST :: forall a. (IArray UArray a, Num a) => [a] -> Int -> a
accumST vals = (!) . runSTArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: (Num a) => ST s (STArray s Int a)
  forM_ (zip vals [1 .. length vals]) $ \(val, i) ->
    readArray arr (i - 1)
    >>= writeArray arr i . (+ val)
  return arr

accumSTFloat vals = (!) . runSTUArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: ST s (STUArray s Int Float)
  forM_ (zip vals [1 .. length vals]) $ \(val, i) ->
    readArray arr (i - 1)
    >>= writeArray arr i . (+ val)
  return arr

accumSTDouble vals = (!) . runSTUArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: ST s (STUArray s Int Double)
  forM_ (zip vals [1 .. length vals]) $ \(val, i) ->
    readArray arr (i - 1)
    >>= writeArray arr i . (+ val)
  return arr

{-# RULES "accumST/Float" accumST = accumSTFloat #-}
{-# RULES "accumST/Double" accumST = accumSTDouble #-}

The Generic Unboxed version (which doesn't work) would have a type constraint like the following:

accumSTU :: forall a. (IArray UArray a, Num a, 
    forall s. MArray (STUArray s) a (ST s)) => [a] -> Int -> a

You could simplify as follows:

-- accumST :: forall a. (IArray UArray a, Num a) => [a] -> Int -> a
accumST :: forall a. (IArray UArray a, Num a) => [a] -> Int -> a
accumST vals = (!) . runSTArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: (Num a) => ST s (STArray s Int a)
  accumST_inner vals arr

accumST_inner vals arr = do
  forM_ (zip vals [1 .. length vals]) $ \(val, i) ->
    readArray arr (i - 1)
    >>= writeArray arr i . (+ val)
  return arr

accumSTFloat vals = (!) . runSTUArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: ST s (STUArray s Int Float)
  accumST_inner vals arr

accumSTDouble vals = (!) . runSTUArray $ do
  arr <- newArray (0, length vals) 0 :: ST s (STUArray s Int Double)
  accumST_inner vals arr

{-# RULES "accumST/Float" accumST = accumSTFloat #-}
{-# RULES "accumST/Double" accumST = accumSTDouble #-}
share|improve this answer
1  
The rules only fire if compiled with optimizations enabled. –  Kyle Butt Feb 8 '10 at 21:14
    
I ended up using a different workaround for now - see answer below –  yairchu Feb 11 '10 at 12:14

So here's the workaround I'm going with for now - creating a new typeclass for types for which (forall s. MArray (STUArray s) a (ST s)):

class IArray UArray a => Unboxed a where
  newSTUArray :: Ix i => (i, i) -> a -> ST s (STUArray s i a)
  readSTUArray :: Ix i => STUArray s i a -> i -> ST s a
  writeSTUArray :: Ix i => STUArray s i a -> i -> a -> ST s ()

instance Unboxed Float where
  newSTUArray = newArray
  readSTUArray = readArray
  writeSTUArray = writeArray

instance Unboxed Double where
  newSTUArray = newArray
  readSTUArray = readArray
  writeSTUArray = writeArray

While I'm not perfectly satisfied with this, I prefer it on rules because:

  • rules depend on optimizations
  • rules are not really supposed to change the algorithm (?). where in this case they would as boxed arrays have very different behaviour regarding lazyness etc.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.