Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Some of my C programs are not working as expected. For example, pass by reference is not possible in C, but when I write a C program which uses that and compile it with gcc it works fine.

Is gcc a C++ compiler? How do I make it behave like a C compiler?

share|improve this question
11  
You can't say something like that (re PBR) without posting some code! –  Joe Feb 8 '10 at 16:33
2  
I agree with Joe: you need to post your code--and file names. If your source file has and extension which is one of .cpp, .cc, .C or .c++ (and some others) it will compile it as C++. If it is compiling a .c file with gcc (or g++), call by reference will not compile. Note, too, that if you try to link your c++ objects with gcc, it will probably not link successfully, because gcc will not link the C++ library by default. –  Tim Schaeffer Feb 8 '10 at 16:47
    
@Joe: What is PBR? –  Roger Pate Feb 8 '10 at 17:05
    
gcc looks at the file extension. if the file is *.c it is compiled as C. If the file is *.cpp it is compiled as C++. –  Loki Astari Feb 8 '10 at 17:21
    
@Roger I meant 'pass by reference' –  Joe Feb 8 '10 at 19:26

6 Answers 6

gcc, g++, and the other frontends use filenames to determine language. For example, the only major difference between gcc and g++ is one that bites new C++ programmers: different link settings (for the C++ stdlib).

Use the -x option (and maybe -std) to specify explicitly, if your files get mis-detected. Or follow the common naming conventions that gcc uses for filenames. For C this means *.c.

Double-check that you didn't use a capital/uppercase *.C to name your file; that's detected as C++.

share|improve this answer

If I compile this:

int f( int & r ) {
    return r + 1;
}

int main() {
    int x = 3;
    return f( x );
}

with:

 gcc e.c

I get:

 e.c:1: error: expected ';', ',' or ')' before '&' token

Have you perhaps given the file you are compiling a .cpp extension? If you have, the gcc driver will compile it as a C++ file.

share|improve this answer

The program gcc is a driver which can dispatch to a C, a C++, an Ada, a Fortran, a Java and probably other compilers depending on what is installed and the extension of the file.

If those are wisely chosen, you shouldn't have to do anything to get C files compiled as C and C++ files compiled as C++. To force compiling as C, use -x c as an option before the compiled file.

My guess is that you have named your file with an uppercase C instead of an lowercase one, and the uppercase C is considered as C++.

share|improve this answer

Try defining the command-line option -pedantic, and specify the C standard you wish to comply to, e.g. --std=c99 for C99, --std=c89 for C89; this should make it reject anything not part of the specified standard.

Edit: Note that -ansi can stand for either C89 or C++98, and might not work to force the compiler into “C-mode”.

share|improve this answer
1  
If only it would make it compile a C++ source as C... –  UncleBens Feb 8 '10 at 16:44
    
Actually, if it thinks the file is a C++ source, it ignores flags like --std=c89. It does warn you it is doing so, however. –  anon Feb 8 '10 at 16:46
    
True, if the file already has the extension .cpp then specifying a C standard causes a warning. Then again, trying to do that is a sign that something else is broken. =) –  Arkku Feb 8 '10 at 16:46
    
So it appears this solution is only valid for this specific problem with -Werror (to stop make, etc.). Whether that option should always be used or not is a different question. (Hint: yes :P) –  Roger Pate Feb 8 '10 at 16:52

gcc is the driver. It will invoke the actual different front-end according to the file extension or forcibly -x.

But for g++, it'll force to treat source files as C++ by default, even your file is (*.c) (lowercase).

Why not have a simple trial to convience yourself:

echo "int main() { } " > test.c

gcc -v -c test.c

[Please not the /usr/libexec/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/cc1plus line, which is the actual front-end compiler.]

========================

Using built-in specs.
Target: i386-redhat-linux
Configured with: ../configure --prefix=/usr --mandir=/usr/share/man --infodir=/usr/share/info --enable-shared --enable-threads=posix --enable-checking=release --with-system-zlib --enable-__cxa_atexit --disable-libunwind-exceptions --enable-libgcj-multifile --enable-languages=c,c++,objc,obj-c++,java,fortran,ada --enable-java-awt=gtk --disable-dssi --enable-plugin --with-java-home=/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.4.2-gcj-1.4.2.0/jre --with-cpu=generic --host=i386-redhat-linux
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46)
 /usr/libexec/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/cc1 -quiet -v test.c -quiet -dumpbase test.c -mtune=generic -auxbase test -version -o /tmp/ccUiF4Qr.s
ignoring nonexistent directory "/usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../i386-redhat-linux/include"
#include "..." search starts here:
#include <...> search starts here:
 /usr/local/include
 /usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/include
 /usr/include
End of search list.
GNU C version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46) (i386-redhat-linux)
    compiled by GNU C version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46).
GGC heuristics: --param ggc-min-expand=59 --param ggc-min-heapsize=55455
Compiler executable checksum: 435964263b657ac05d988fae7b6714b1
 as -V -Qy -o test.o /tmp/ccUiF4Qr.s
GNU assembler version 2.17.50.0.6-12.el5 (i386-redhat-linux) using BFD version 2.17.50.0.6-12.el5 20061020

=============================

mv test.c test.cpp
gcc -v -c test.cpp

=============================

Using built-in specs.
Target: i386-redhat-linux
Configured with: ../configure --prefix=/usr --mandir=/usr/share/man --infodir=/usr/share/info --enable-shared --enable-threads=posix --enable-checking=release --with-system-zlib --enable-__cxa_atexit --disable-libunwind-exceptions --enable-libgcj-multifile --enable-languages=c,c++,objc,obj-c++,java,fortran,ada --enable-java-awt=gtk --disable-dssi --enable-plugin --with-java-home=/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.4.2-gcj-1.4.2.0/jre --with-cpu=generic --host=i386-redhat-linux
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46)
 /usr/libexec/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/cc1plus -quiet -v -D_GNU_SOURCE test.cpp -quiet -dumpbase test.cpp -mtune=generic -auxbase test -version -o /tmp/ccUgae0u.s
ignoring nonexistent directory "/usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../i386-redhat-linux/include"
#include "..." search starts here:
#include <...> search starts here:
 /usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2
 /usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/i386-redhat-linux
 /usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/backward
 /usr/local/include
 /usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/include
 /usr/include
End of search list.
GNU C++ version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46) (i386-redhat-linux)
    compiled by GNU C version 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-46).
GGC heuristics: --param ggc-min-expand=59 --param ggc-min-heapsize=55455
Compiler executable checksum: 2c84476b74368e297382b43d14e53b01
 as -V -Qy -o test.o /tmp/ccUgae0u.s
GNU assembler version 2.17.50.0.6-12.el5 (i386-redhat-linux) using BFD version 2.17.50.0.6-12.el5 20061020

================================

mv test.cpp test.c
g++ -v -c test.c

You'll get the same result as gcc + test.cpp, which means compiled as C++.

cc is the C front end cc1plus is the C++ front end. That's it.

share|improve this answer

g++ should be the front-end for C++ and cc for C, but both point to gcc.

If you want to compile standard compliant C code, use gcc -ansi

share|improve this answer
    
-1: -ansi specifies either C90 or C++98, depending on whether it's in C or C++ mode. The -std option is far more explicit. –  greyfade Feb 8 '10 at 19:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.