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In one area of my application I am creating a display that builds itself with actionscript during a loop. (in my actual app there are A LOT of nested children and my function might be looking for any of those children) In that AS I assign each item an ID, but when I try to access that item by it's id it fails. What gives? and how can I accomplish finding a UI component without having to go through knowing all of it's possible parents?

Here's a simplified example of what I'm doing. The button click will fail with an error

ReferenceError: Error #1069: Property myPanel3 not found on Test and there is no default value.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" creationComplete="init();">
    <mx:Script>
        <![CDATA[
            import mx.containers.Panel;
            private function init():void{
                var i:uint = 0;
                for(i = 0; i<10; i++){
                    var loopPanel:Panel = new Panel;
                    loopPanel.title = i.toString();
                    loopPanel.id = "myPanel" + i.toString();
                    myVBox.addChild(loopPanel);
                }
            }

            private function clicked():void{
                var tracePanel:Panel = this["myPanel3"];
                trace(tracePanel);
            }
        ]]>
    </mx:Script>
    <mx:VBox id="myVBox" x="10" y="10" width="500"/>
    <mx:Button id="myBtn" x="518" y="8" label="Click Me" click="clicked();"/>
</mx:Application>
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml" layout="absolute" creationComplete="init();">
<mx:Script>
    <![CDATA[
        import mx.containers.Panel;
        private function init():void{
            var i:uint = 0;
            for(i = 0; i<10; i++){
                var loopPanel:Panel = new Panel;
                loopPanel.title = i.toString();
                loopPanel.name = "myPanel" + i.toString();                                 
                myVBox.addChild(loopPanel);
            }
        }

        private function clicked():void{
            var tracePanel:DisplayObject = myVBox.getChildByName("myPanel3");                
            trace(tracePanel.name);

        }
    ]]>
</mx:Script>
<mx:VBox id="myVBox" x="10" y="10" width="500"/>
<mx:Button id="myBtn" x="518" y="8" label="Click Me" click="clicked();"/>


Changes on two lines:

  loopPanel.name = "myPanel" + i.toString();   

and

  var tracePanel:DisplayObject = myVBox.getChildByName("myPanel3");    

Nesting - you should probably create a dictionary (eg. assocative array with "name" - "object reference" pairs) of your custom objects if you need to access them without searching in subcomponents.

share|improve this answer
    
While that will work I need a way to access the panel without knowing the VBoxes ID, name, or even if it exists. Like I said my actual app is a lot more complicated than the sample and I would like a cleaner approach then having to go through all the parent levels. – invertedSpear Feb 8 '10 at 17:16
    
Check the last paragraph, I don't think there is a built in storage like that. Alternatively you can go through the object tree each time. – Robert Bak Feb 8 '10 at 17:19
    
a dictionary is a good idea, never really thought of doing something like that before, kind of like IDing them myself. Any idea why assigning ID's on the fly doesn't work? – invertedSpear Feb 8 '10 at 17:24
    
I think it's actually more about how MXML works, it creates public variables that point to those componenets on the main class. If you're interested in seeing how it works add "--keep-generated-actionscript" to complier arguments and take a look at the code. – Robert Bak Feb 8 '10 at 17:45

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