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I'm using a custom MemberShipProvider in a c# project based on the code from: http://www.asp.net/learn/videos/video-189.aspx and for some reason I can't figure out, the method that decrypts the user password to validate the login gives an extra 8 characters in front of the password value (for example: 䝉慣嘗㳪畕锬password).

I use "encrypted" passwordFormat and the method UnEncodePassword consists in:

private string UnEncodePassword(string encodedPassword)
{
    string password = encodedPassword;
    password = Encoding.Unicode.GetString(DecryptPassword(Convert.FromBase64String(encodedPassword)));

    return password;
}

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

"䝉慣嘗㳪畕锬" is the salt? (updated)

On the server, in a web.config or other you have a salt value such as "milkshake". When the user gives a password like "TheYard" you add the salt and encrypt "milkshakeTheYard". When they login, you add the salt to their request and compare it to the encrypted string.

So what's the point of salt? If the encrypted password fell into the wrong hands, "TheYard" being only 7 characters is easy to lookup on a Rainbow Table. By adding salt, you make this process much harder.

Salt by itself provides little security, but used in combination provides an easily implmeneted extra layer.

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sorry...I don't understand? –  David Aleu Feb 8 '10 at 22:43
    
I see, within the context of my question, password is "the password" and is the word I'm expecting solely from the DecryptPassword method, hence my problem because I'm getting those eight cryptic characters+clear_password_value. It must be something silly because clearly the encryption/decryption works or I wouldn't even get the clear text when decrypting otherwise. :( –  David Aleu Feb 9 '10 at 10:09
    
Sorry mate but I have to downvote your answer as it´s a comment and I want to keep what's the valid answer at the top. –  David Aleu Feb 10 '10 at 8:50
2  
You can mark your answer as an answer. Downvoting people who help you is a slap in the face. –  Dead account Feb 10 '10 at 12:34
    
@tricat Don't downvote people just because you do not like their answer. You should only downvote if it's technically wrong or bad practice. If it's a valid answer it should not be downvoted. –  Bobby Cannon May 30 '11 at 15:30

You should not be able to decrypt the password. You should encrypt the user-entered password and compare it to the stored encrypted password. Password recovery should generate a random one-time use password and force the user to change it the first time it's used.

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1  
The DecryptPassword is a method in the .NET Security assembly, I'm just overriding the existing method to make it work with my custom membership. Your post should be a comment, not an answer. –  David Aleu Feb 9 '10 at 13:32
    
You're right. But my thinking is that if you can decrypt the password then you might as well store it in clear text. –  Jamie Ide Feb 9 '10 at 13:55
    
I see your point but at least having the passwords and other sensible information in a unreadable format in the database is secure enough to pass a security audit. Decrypting the information requires the machinekey so even with the database and knowing the way DecryptPassword method works won't be enough to compromise my data. –  David Aleu Feb 9 '10 at 14:16
1  
It depends on the auditor. :-) You will be able to decrypt the passwords, right? Most people re-use the same login/password on multiple sites so with a little additional work you can compromise their logins on other sites. Users should be confident that their passwords are secure from you too. –  Jamie Ide Feb 9 '10 at 14:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Found it! I have to subtract the 16 bytes salt from my decrypted encodedPassword variable to get the password:

private string UnEncodePassword(string encodedPassword)
{
    string password = encodedPassword;
    byte[] bytesIn = Convert.FromBase64String(encodedPassword);
    byte[] bytesRet = DecryptPassword(bytesIn);
    password = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetString(bytesRet, 16, bytesRet.Length - 16);

    return password;
}

Thanks Ian to give me the clue about the salt!

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2  
You're just removing the word "䝉慣嘗㳪畕锬" from your string without really knowing why. byteRet is your decrypted string, unicode is 2 bytes per character, so your last line says "convert bytes to string, ignoring the last 8 characters". Or is there anohter reason for using the value of 16? –  Dead account Feb 10 '10 at 12:39

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