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I can point some differences between Java language and C++ like:

  • Java uses both compiler and interpreter, C++ only compiler;
  • C++ compiles to machine language, when Java compiles to byte code;
  • Unlikely Java, C++ has pointers (?);
  • In C++ the programmer needs to worry about freeing the allocated memory, where in Java the Garbage Collector takes care of the the unneeded / unused variables

but how about the Applets? Which differences could I point out comparing to C++?


I'm study for a test and my professor give us a "Study Guide", where there is a question that is:

"State 3 ways that an Applet is significantly different from a typical C++ program."

I know the basic differences between Java/C++, I just don't know what is expected to write about Applets and C++. It seems a stranger comparison for me...

He also asked about the differences and similarities between both languages, this one about Applets vs C++ that seems stranger..

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7  
There are no Applets in C++. –  Andreas Mar 6 '14 at 18:34
    
yeah, I corrected my question... sorry! –  inessadl Mar 6 '14 at 18:35
3  
Java has pointers. In fact, you use a lot more pointers in Java than in correctly written C++. –  James Kanze Mar 6 '14 at 18:38
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In well-written C++, you rarely need to worry about freeing memory. Automatic storage takes care of most of it, and RAII takes care of just about everything else. Garbage collection only helps if you don't bother to define a clear ownership model. –  Mike Seymour Mar 6 '14 at 18:46
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@JamesKanze: Without ownership, nothing is responsible for releasing the object. (Self-ownership, which (from previous discussions) I believe is how you think all dynamic objects should be managed, is still an ownership model.) –  Mike Seymour Mar 6 '14 at 19:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would point out the following facts:

  • An applet is written in Java, which basically means you can execute the same code on different architectures as long as they have an implementation of the JVM.

  • An applet can be sandboxed, which allows the execution of untrusted code. Doing this with C++ is not supported "out of the box".

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There is no such thing as C++ applets.

This is because the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) execution model lets code be "sandboxed", letting the browser and/or user limit what it has access to on the executing machine. The JVM also means that the code can be executed on any processor, whereas if you downloaded a C++ executable you'd either have to compile it locally or have a separate downloadable for every possible architecture.

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1  
The C++ standard would not prevent someone from implementing a compiler which produced code to run in a sandbox. But nobody has done it yet, because there is no need for it. This is apparently not an area of software engineering where anyone would consider C++ to be the tool of choice. –  Christian Hackl Mar 6 '14 at 18:53
    
Sorry if I didn't express myself well, English is not my first language. I'm NOT assuming that are C++ applets. I'm study for a test and my professor give us a "Study Guide", where there is a question that I'm supposed to know on the test and is "State 3 ways that an Applet is significantly different from a typical C++ program." I know the basic differences between Java/C++, I just don't know what is expected to write about Applets and C++. It seems a stranger comparison for me... –  inessadl Mar 6 '14 at 18:53
    
He did say "different from a typical C++ program". So any of the key differences between the applet environment and the way C++ programs run (including simply the fact that it executes inside a browser) would qualify. Yes, it's an odd question. –  keshlam Mar 6 '14 at 19:02

I think you're asking two different questions in one

  • the differences between Java and C++, and
  • the differences between an applet and an application.

You've already listed some of the key differences between Java and C++ (although you missed the whole business of interfaces and multiple inheritance). The key difference between an applet and an application is that an applet runs in a container of some type - a browser in the case of a Java web applet. This means that it's in an environment that severely restricts what operations it can perform.

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actually the questions are: 1) State 3 ways that an Applet is significantly different from a typical C++ program. 2) State 3 ways that Java is significantly different from C++. 3) State 3 ways that Java is significantly similar to C++. It seems stranger, I will ask him if is this okay. Thank you! –  inessadl Mar 6 '14 at 19:55

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