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I have a C# while loop, does a continue in this loop issue the same behaviour as moving to the next item in the loop? Exactly the same as for a "for loop".

For example see any problems in the following code sample?

while ((line = file.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                string messageDownloadID = line ;
                if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(messageDownloadID))
                {
                    continue;
                }
            }

Thanks in advance.

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Read section 8.9.2 of the specification for details. –  Eric Lippert Feb 8 '10 at 18:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, continue moves to the next iteration of the loop.

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+1 quickest on the draw –  Dead account Feb 8 '10 at 17:01

I have a C# while loop, does a continue in this loop issue the same behaviour as moving to the next item in the loop? Exactly the same as for a "for loop".

No, a continue does not have the behavior of moving to the next item unless the part of the while block that moves to the next item is part of the loop condition or occurs and is executed before the continue statement. A continue will move you to the next iteration of the loop. The continue statement always starts a new iteration in the nearest enclosing while, do, for or foreach statement. But if in a while loop, say, i++ occurs after the continue statement it will not be executed. It is NOT exactly the same as a for loop.

The semantics of continue are like so:

while(condition) {
    statement
    continue
    statement
}

is equivalent to

top:
while(condition) {
    statement
    goto top;
    statement
}

In this case, the statements after the continue will never be executed if the continue is executed. But, for example, these two loops have different semantics:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    if (i == 5) {
        continue;
    }
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}

int j = 0;
while (j < 10) {
   if (j == 5) {
      continue;
   }
   Console.WriteLine(j);
   j++;

}

The former loop will print 0 through 9 on the console while the second will enter an infinite loop after print 0 through 4 on the console.

For example see any problems in the following code sample?

while ((line = file.ReadLine()) != null) { 
    string messageDownloadID = line;
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(messageDownloadID)) { 
        continue; 
    } 
}

Well, it depends. First, this loop isn't doing anything really except moving the file pointer in file to the end of the file. Now, assuming that you meant to have statements after the if statement like so

while ((line = file.ReadLine()) != null) { 
    string messageDownloadID = line;
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(messageDownloadID)) { 
        continue; 
    }
    ProcessMessageDownloadID(messageDownloadID);
}

then your code is fine. This is because the part of the while that moves to the next item is part of the while condition (see my bolded statement above) and thus will be executed every iteration of the loop. Your code is a standard pattern for parsing a file and skipping over items that can't be parsed (because they are, say, blank).

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@Jason, good job on the exhaustive explanation, but is this behavior really as counterintuitive or "gotcha" as you seem to imply? You stress the idea that "anything after the continue" doesn't get executed, but that seems rather obvious. What would be the point of a flow-control statement if it didn't...control the flow? –  Adam Robinson Feb 8 '10 at 18:46
    
@Adam Robinson: I only stress it because the point is clearly confusing to the OP (hence his question). I note in particular the OP's emphasis on asking whether or not continue moves to the next item in the loop. –  Jason Feb 8 '10 at 19:42
    
I guess I just don't see any confusion on the OP's part; his choice of terms ("item" vs. "iteration") was obviously imprecise, but I think that the assumption that he's highly confused by this distinction might be premature. –  Adam Robinson Feb 8 '10 at 20:10
    
@Adam Robinson: But you must see my point that there must be some confusion or there would be no question? –  Jason Feb 8 '10 at 20:30

Yes, a continue call will restart the loop. Kind of like a goto to a label at the start of the loop.

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Yes.

"A while loop can be terminated when a break, goto, return, or throw statement transfers control outside the loop. To pass control to the next iteration without exiting the loop, use the continue statement."

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