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The below list comprehension gives the desired output, but it seems kind of long because I have to specifically reference each value in the sub-dictionary because the value for each primary key is another dictionary. Is there a way to make my list comprehension shorter and still provide the same output? I'm looking for a one line solution, if it's possible.

myDict = {'pKey_b': {'val3': 'vb3', 'val1': 'vb1', 'val4': 'vb4', 'val2': 'vb2'}, 'pKey_a': {'val3': 'va3', 'val1': 'va1', 'val4': 'va4', 'val2': 'va2'}, 'pKey_e': {'val3': 've3', 'val1': 've1', 'val4': 've4', 'val2': 've2'}, 'pKey_d': {'val3': 'vd3', 'val1': 'vd1', 'val4': 'vd4', 'val2': 'vd2'}, 'pKey_c': {'val3': 'vc3', 'val1': 'vc1', 'val4': 'vc4', 'val2': 'vc2'}}

myListComp = sorted(sorted([k, v.values()[0], v.values()[1], v.values()[2], v.values()[3]]) for k, v in myDict.items())

print myListComp
'''
[
['pKey_a', 'va1', 'va2', 'va3', 'va4'],
['pKey_b', 'vb1', 'vb2', 'vb3', 'vb4'],
['pKey_c', 'vc1', 'vc2', 'vc3', 'vc4'],
['pKey_d', 'vd1', 'vd2', 'vd3', 'vd4'],
['pKey_e', 've1', 've2', 've3', 've4']
]
'''
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about:

>>> lc = sorted(sorted([k] + sorted(v.values()) for k,v in myDict.items()))
>>> for row in lc:
...     print row
...     
['pKey_a', 'va1', 'va2', 'va3', 'va4']
['pKey_b', 'vb1', 'vb2', 'vb3', 'vb4']
['pKey_c', 'vc1', 'vc2', 'vc3', 'vc4']
['pKey_d', 'vd1', 'vd2', 'vd3', 'vd4']
['pKey_e', 've1', 've2', 've3', 've4']

although you might also want

>>> lc = sorted(sorted([k] + [v[x] for x in sorted(v)] for k,v in myDict.items()))
>>> for row in lc:
...     print row
...     
['pKey_a', 'va1', 'va2', 'va3', 'va4']
['pKey_b', 'vb1', 'vb2', 'vb3', 'vb4']
['pKey_c', 'vc1', 'vc2', 'vc3', 'vc4']
['pKey_d', 'vd1', 'vd2', 'vd3', 'vd4']
['pKey_e', 've1', 've2', 've3', 've4']

depending on whether you want the values to appear in sorted order of the values, or the order of the corresponding sorted keys. Here they're both the same.

Note that in your original code, the keys don't need to show up as the first element, as the sort could potentially mix them with the values; I've made sure that they stay first.

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How about yet another way to do it on top of what DSM's suggsted:

result = [[k] + map(myDict[k].get, sorted(v)) for k, v in sorted(myDict.iteritems())]
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From help(dict.values):

values(...)
    D.values() -> list of D's values

Knowing dict.values() returns a list (and not a tuple) you can simplify your list comprehension to this:

myList = sorted([k] + sorted(v.values()) for k, v in myDict.items())

If later on you realize you require only the first four elements on v.values(), slice it like this v.values()[:4].

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