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I have a list of vectors (shown below). I would like to know in which list elements each element of the vectors are. In other words, I would like to invert the list to make a new list whose names are taken from the vectors.

What is the best method to do this?

lst <- list(a=c(2, 3, 6, 10, 15, 17), b=c(4, 6, 9, 7, 6, 4, 3, 10), 
            c=c(9, 2, 1, 4, 3), d=c(3, 6, 17))
lst
$a
[1]  2  3  6 10 15 17

$b
[1]  4  6  9  7  6  4  3 10

$c
[1] 9 2 1 4 3

$d
[1]  3  6 17

I would like to get the following answer.

$`1`
[1] "c"

$`10`
[1] "a" "b"

$`15`
[1] "a"

$`17`
[1] "a" "d"

$`2`
[1] "a" "c"

$`3`
[1] "a" "b" "c" "d"

$`4`
[1] "b" "b" "c"

$`6`
[1] "a" "b" "b" "d"

$`7`
[1] "b"

$`9`
[1] "b" "c"
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's a base R way with stack and unstack:

unstack(stack(lst), ind ~ values)
# $`1`
# [1] "c"
# 
# $`2`
# [1] "a" "c"
# 
# $`3`
# [1] "a" "b" "c" "d"
# 
# $`4`
# [1] "b" "b" "c"
# 
# $`6`
# [1] "a" "b" "b" "d"
# 
# $`7`
# [1] "b"
# 
# $`9`
# [1] "b" "c"
# 
# $`10`
# [1] "a" "b"
# 
# $`15`
# [1] "a"
# 
# $`17`
# [1] "a" "d"
share|improve this answer
1  
Clever use of unstack. +1 –  Ananda Mahto Mar 6 '14 at 19:05
    
@Matthew Thanks. It works and simple. –  BioChemoinformatics Mar 6 '14 at 19:07
    
I don't quite understand what the point of the lapply(lst, as.vector) is. At least for this example you could replace that with lst and nothing would change. –  Dason May 1 '14 at 2:00
    
@Dason, that's because a different "Kevin" has edited the question to their tastes which made the existing answers a little bit off. jbaums tried to fix that, but must have missed your observation. I'm sure Matthew would have noticed that on his own. –  Ananda Mahto May 1 '14 at 4:56
    
@Dason Thanks. I've updated the answer. The original question had a list of matrices. –  Matthew Plourde May 1 '14 at 14:45

Here's an approach using split from base R after using melt from "reshape2":

library(reshape2)
x <- melt(lst)
split(x$L1, x$value)
# $`1`
# [1] "c"
# 
# $`2`
# [1] "a" "c"
# 
# $`3`
# [1] "a" "b" "c" "d"
# 
# $`4`
# [1] "b" "b" "c"
# 
# $`6`
# [1] "a" "b" "b" "d"
# 
# $`7`
# [1] "b"
# 
# $`9`
# [1] "b" "c"
# 
# $`10`
# [1] "a" "b"
# 
# $`15`
# [1] "a"
# 
# $`17`
# [1] "a" "d"

Similarly, in base R with stack:

x <- stack(lapply(lst, c))
split(as.character(x$ind), x$values)

Or even more directly if you were working with "lst" and not "lst":

x <- stack(lst)
split(as.character(x$ind), x$values)

To elaborate on my comment, the more efficient way I was describing to was:

split(rep(names(lst), lapply(lst, nrow)), unlist(lst, use.names = FALSE))

Applied to a much bigger lst, we get the following:

fun1 <- function() split(rep(names(lst), lapply(lst, nrow)), unlist(lst, use.names = FALSE))
fun2 <- function() { x <- stack(lapply(lst, c)) ; split(as.character(x$ind), x$values) }
fun3 <- function() { x <- melt(lst) ; split(x$L1, x$value) }
fun4 <- function() unstack(stack(lapply(lst, as.vector)), ind ~ values)

## Make lst much bigger
lst <- unlist(replicate(10000, lst, simplify = FALSE), recursive=FALSE)
names(lst) <- make.unique(names(lst))

library(microbenchmark)

system.time(fun3())
#   user  system elapsed 
# 48.338   0.000  47.643 

microbenchmark(fun1(), fun2(), fun4(), times = 5)
# Unit: milliseconds
#   expr       min        lq   median        uq       max neval
# fun1()  454.5913  456.6793  473.901  555.8954  574.4394     5
# fun2()  922.1282 1028.4972 1034.872 1068.4761 1150.8072     5
# fun4() 1222.5296 1300.0643 1323.253 1339.2037 1421.1546     5
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Ananda, thanks. It works. But if the list.1 is very large, 'melt' seems a little lower speed, right? Do you have a more efficient method? –  BioChemoinformatics Mar 6 '14 at 19:01
    
@Kevin, stack should be faster than melt, or you could use rep and unlist. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 6 '14 at 19:02
    
Thanks Ananda. Your answer is what I want. –  BioChemoinformatics Mar 6 '14 at 19:06

unlist the list to get all of the numbers in the vectors. Then, use these numbers to split a vector of the names of the list elements.

split( rep(names(lst),times=sapply(lst,length)),
         unlist(lst) )
$`1`
[1] "c"

$`2`
[1] "a" "c"

$`3`
[1] "a" "b" "c" "d"

$`4`
[1] "b" "b" "c"

$`6`
[1] "a" "b" "b" "d"

$`7`
[1] "b"

$`9`
[1] "b" "c"

$`10`
[1] "a" "b"

$`15`
[1] "a"

$`17`
[1] "a" "d"
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty much the same as my answer but with length instead of nrow (which was the correct answer with the original version of your question). –  Ananda Mahto May 1 '14 at 2:50
    
The code is the same, but I like this presentation better. I should have read your answer more thoroughly. I didn't find fun1 until after I posted my answer. It shouldn't matter though, your more thorough answer appropriately has more votes and will remain at the top. –  kdauria May 1 '14 at 4:36
    
And sorry if this was confusing, but I'm not the same "Kevin" who posted the question. I edited the original question because it was difficult for me to read. –  kdauria May 1 '14 at 4:40
    
Didn't notice that you weren't the same "Kevin". Your edit was pretty disruptive though. Another user has now gone and edited my answer and the accepted answer to match your edit of the question, also assuming that you were the OP. The change to the first paragraph for readability was fine, but not sure about the altered code on which the existing answers were based. –  Ananda Mahto May 1 '14 at 4:52
    
I realize now the havoc have caused. Sorry about that. Lesson learned. –  kdauria May 1 '14 at 5:52

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