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I am using gcc (Unbuntu 4.4.1-4unbuntu9) to compile a program that I'm writing, but it seems to vomit whenever it sees a // comment in my code, saying:

interface.c :##: error: expected expression before â/â token

Does the gcc compile mode I'm using forbid // comments?

$ gcc -g -ansi -pedantic interface.c structs.h -c -I. -I/home/me/project/h

Why?

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7 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted

// comments are not allowed in old (pre 99) C versions, use /**/ (or remove the -ansi, that is a synonym for the C89 standard)

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Short, accurate and to the point. Best answer so far, and likely the best conceivable. –  JUST MY correct OPINION Jun 12 '10 at 6:18
    
Without -ansi, gcc currently supports C89 with GNU-specific extensions; one of those extensions happens to be // comments. With -std=c99, it attempts to conform to the 1999 ISO C standard, which requires support for // comments. –  Keith Thompson Apr 24 '13 at 22:13
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See C++ comments in GNU compiler documentation.

In GNU C, you may use C++ style comments, which start with // and continue until the end of the line. Many other C implementations allow such comments, and they are included in the 1999 C standard. However, C++ style comments are not recognized if you specify an -std option specifying a version of ISO C before C99, or -ansi (equivalent to -std=c89).

(Emphasis is mine because some of the posts claim that // are not allowed in standard C whereas that is only true for pre-99 standards).

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For some of us, "Standard C" was standardized long before '99. Always wise to specify exactly which revision of the standard! :-) –  Brian Knoblauch Feb 8 '10 at 18:09
    
@Brian: So... what we need is a standard... standard. –  Amy Feb 8 '10 at 19:00
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// comments are actually a C++ feature in origin, which is why -ansi disables them.

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They are valid C too, for over the past 10 years. –  Roger Pate Feb 8 '10 at 17:48
    
Yeah. Edited to express what I meant more precisely. –  chaos Feb 8 '10 at 18:06
    
They actually originated in BCPL, one of C's distance ancestors. C++ adopted them from the beginning; C didn't until 1999. –  Keith Thompson Apr 24 '13 at 22:12
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// is not ansi-C compliant.

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Someone really needs to read their ANSI spec. It's been legal C for 11 years. –  JUST MY correct OPINION Jun 12 '10 at 6:17
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// is a C++ feature, and probably not available in ANSI-C mode. Try surrounding the comment with the C-style /* ... */ comment marker.

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Given your use of "probably" and "try" it sounds like you are guessing, which I don't think is helpful in this case. –  Bryan Oakley Feb 8 '10 at 19:01
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this new style of using // as the beginning mark of a comment has not been aproved by ANSI. Make sure your C compiler supports // before use it.

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Yes, it has for a number of years now. // comments were introduced by the 1999 ISO C standard, which was adopted by ANSI, superseding the 1989 ANSI and 1990 ISO standards. The 1989 ANSI standard is officially obsolete. But gcc's -ansi options specifies conformance to the 1989 ANSI C standard. Use -std=c99, or just drop the -ansi (without it, gcc doesn't conform to C99, but it does accept // comments as an extension). –  Keith Thompson Apr 24 '13 at 22:11
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Judging by the output it looks like the compiler is choking on the foreign letter 'a' separated by a slash followed by another foreign 'a'. It could be looking for a comment and gives up. Try removing that comment and retry compiling again.

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That â thing is actually a separate, unrelated output encoding issue. The âs are not actually in his code. –  chaos Feb 8 '10 at 17:38
    
^ This is exactly what is happening. –  rlb.usa Feb 8 '10 at 18:38
    
The â characters are mistranslations of the non-ASCII left and right single quotation marks that gcc uses in its error messages. You can tell gcc to stick to ASCII output by setting $LANG to "C": LANG=c gcc ... –  Keith Thompson Apr 24 '13 at 22:15
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