Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to add my own flag to an existing git command. Is this doable?

Something like git diff --myownthing.

How would I do this?

share|improve this question
    
What will it do? –  zerkms Mar 6 at 23:03
1  
Echo "hooray it worked" and exit. What does it matter? –  Joe Frambach Mar 6 at 23:05
1  
because I'm curious of the practical usage. What exact process will "echo hooray"? git is the command to process arguments, how is it supposed to pass the execution to something else? –  zerkms Mar 6 at 23:12
    
When I git pull --rebase and a conflict occurs, it says "fix yer crap and hit git pull --continue, or --abort.". I want to create another option --table which will not abort the procedure, but let me leave all this crap in an unfinished state and pick it up later. I could create a new git table command but I feel that it's part of pull, not it's own standalone command. –  Joe Frambach Mar 6 at 23:21
    
Watch out for the word "table." It means different things in different locales: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_%28parliamentary_procedure%29 (to "table" something in the US means to put it aside for now; in most of the rest of the world it means the opposite, i.e. to bring something into consideration). –  Gary Fixler Mar 6 at 23:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if you can modify the built-in Git commands to accept additional parameters without actually modifying Git source code, but you can easily make Git aliases that will accept parameters.

See, for example:

  1. http://stackoverflow.com/a/3322412/456814
  2. http://stackoverflow.com/a/7005698/456814
share|improve this answer

In your .gitconfig file you can define bash functions as aliases. I'm not sure if you could get the functionality you want but you could make git pull perform some other steps as well as /instead of the default.

For instance I have diff = "!f() { git diff --color=always "$@" | less -R; }; f" as an alias which pipes git diff to less rather than stdout.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.