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My string looks like this

important stuff: some text 2: some text 3.

I want to only print "important stuff". So basically I want to print everything up to the first colon. I'm sure this is simple, but my regex foo is not so good.

Edit: Sorry I was doing something stupid and gave you a bad example line. It has been corrected.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just restrict what you're matching to non-colons, [^:]*. Note, the ^ and : boundaries aren't actually needed, but they help document the intent behind the regex.

my $text = "important stuff: some text 2: some text 3."

if ($text =~ /^([^:]*):/) {
    print "$1";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I gave you a bad example line. It was working correctly when I used my original example. I actually need it to match everything up to the first colon. thanks for the help so far! – hypnotoad Mar 7 '14 at 1:32
    
You beat me to the answer, on my hashed edits so I gave you a vote too. – alexmac Mar 7 '14 at 1:34
    
@hypnotoad I've editted the response for your revised spec. The only thing that needed to be changed were the boundary conditions. – Miller Mar 7 '14 at 1:38

Consider just splitting on the colon:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $string = 'important stuff: some text 2: some text 3.';
my $important = ( split /:/, $string )[0];
print $important;

Output:

important stuff
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the most efficient answer by a factor of ten. It's on-par with $important = substr $string, 0, index($string, ':');, but more Perlish. ;) – DavidO Mar 7 '14 at 6:23
    
@DavidO - Appreciate your comments. Thank you. – Kenosis Mar 7 '14 at 6:31
    
I forgot to mention, do use the third param of split to cause split to stop working after it finds the colon: (split /:/, $ string, 2)[0]. (That's what I did when I tested.) – DavidO Mar 7 '14 at 7:39

Well, assume its a string

$test = "sass sg22gssg 22222 2222:  important  important  :"

Assume you want all characters between.

Wrong answer: $test =~ /:(.+):/;  # thank you for the change from .{1,}

Corrected. 
$test =~ /:([^:]*):/; 

print $1; #perl  memory u can assign to a string ;

$found = $1;

As a cheat sheet of regex in perl. cheat sheet

I did test it.

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it gets a bit more complex if you want to match multiple : x : matches, the g can to match over and over and get an array from that. – alexmac Mar 7 '14 at 0:58
1  
{1,} is usually just specified as +. and if there are newlines, you will need the /s flag to make . match them – ysth Mar 7 '14 at 0:58
1  
@hypnotoad: it shouldn't, unless there are newlines between the first set of colons. if there are, do /:(.+):/s instead (or do /:([^:]*):/ as in the other answer) – ysth Mar 7 '14 at 1:06
1  
Sorry guys I gave you a bad example line. It was working correctly when I used my original example. I actually need it to match everything up to the first colon. thanks for the help so far! – hypnotoad Mar 7 '14 at 1:31
1  
@alexmac Your first regex would've worked if you had done non-greedy matching, :(.*?): I personally like restricting the allowed character set for a matched value instead of just relying on boundary conditions, as that is often faster and also less prone to simple mistakes like forgetting to do non-greedy versus greedy. – Miller Mar 7 '14 at 1:42

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