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I'm using a function called get_string() which returns a pointer to a string to get input from the keyboard. At the end of the program char **arr should hold an array of pointers to the strings entered using the keyboard. char *tmp_arr_ptr is used as a temporary pointer for a case memory allocation fails (not to lose all the data).

At 1st I allocate 1 char sized space for arr. After that in the for loop, tmp_str_ptr gets a pointer to a string from the function. If this string has no characters in it the loop is broken out from. If the string is not empty, the current one before last cell gets an address for tmp_str_ptr. The process is repeated until an empty string is entered and then a NULL in inserted at the last space in arr (this is in order to pass arr as a pointer without the number of elements in it so the function will know when to stop looking for additional pointers).

The code works fine for up to two strings, more than that and I start getting errors. Also I get a warning on arr=tmp_arr_ptr; saying assignment from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default] and would like to resolve that as well.

This is the latest updated version of my code with fixed that reflects comments from users around here:

char **arr;
char **tmp_arr_ptr;
char *tmp_str_ptr;
int   i;

int main()
{
    if((arr=malloc(sizeof(*arr)))==NULL)
    {
        printf("Error allocating memory, Exiting.\n");
        printf("malloc for arr");
        return 1;
    }

    for(i=0;;i++)
    {
        printf("Enter string\n");
        printf("-->");
        tmp_str_ptr=get_string();
        if(*tmp_str_ptr=='\n')
            break;
        tmp_arr_ptr=realloc(arr,(i+2)*sizeof(**arr));
        if(tmp_arr_ptr!=NULL)
        {
            arr=tmp_arr_ptr;
            arr[i]=tmp_str_ptr;
            arr[i+1]=NULL;
        }
        else
        {
            free(arr);
            printf("Error allocating memory, Exiting.\n");
            printf("realloc for tmp_arr_ptr");
            return 1;
        }
    }

    printf("The most common character among the strings is %c",char_with_most_appearances(arr));

    for(i=0;;i++)
    {
        if(arr[i]!=NULL)
            free(arr[i]);
        else
        {
            free(arr);
            break;
        }
    }

    free(tmp_str_ptr);

    return 0;
}

So after running the debugger it seems that the char_with_most_appearances causes a segmentation error. Here is the function:

char char_with_most_appearances(char **str_arr_ptr)
{
    int i=0,j,most=0,loc=0;
    int count_array[128]={0};

    while((str_arr_ptr[i]!=NULL)
    {
        for(j=0;j<strlen(str_arr_ptr[i]);j++)
            count_array[(int)str_arr_ptr[i][j]]++;
        i++;
    }

    for(i=0;i<128;i++)
    {
        if(count_array[i]>most)
        {
            most=count_array[i];
            loc=i;
        }
    }

    return (char)loc;
}

At 1st, it checks that the pointer is not NULL (last element in pointer array), next it will go through the array and count how many times each character appears and save that info in an array called count_array. It has 128 cells like ASCII and the char ASCII value is used as an index for the array. For example is the character 'a' is found then count_array[97] gets +1. After all the string was scanned, the biggest element in the array is searched and it's location is returned with a cast to a char which actually returns it's ASCII char.

share|improve this question
    
What errors are you getting? –  Cramer Mar 7 '14 at 1:37
    
@Cramer - s28.postimg.org/czicn12od/err.png –  user34920 Mar 7 '14 at 1:40
    
I would try running it in a debugger (looks like you're on windows, if you're in an IDE then there should be one built in). Learning to use a debugger is a necessary (and very helpful) skill. It will tell you which line is accessing the wrong bit of memory and you can work backwards to find where that address comes from. –  Cramer Mar 7 '14 at 1:43
    
@Cramer - Just did that and posted the code the causes the error. This line - for(j=0;j<strlen(str_arr_ptr[i]);j++) –  user34920 Mar 7 '14 at 1:53
    
That line isn't in the code above. Have a look around to see what might be going wrong, perhaps i is greater than the length of str_arr_ptr? –  Cramer Mar 7 '14 at 1:57

2 Answers 2

At first didn't notice your realloc. You need to first assign your tmp_arr_ptr to arr before you can write in the additional space:

tmp_arr_ptr=realloc(arr,(i+1)*sizeof(*arr));
if(tmp_arr_ptr!=NULL)
     arr=tmp_arr_ptr;
     arr[i]=tmp_str_ptr;
share|improve this answer
    
Until the loop is done running for the last time (got empty string) I can't tell the size of the required space. I thought I am reallocating space in the loop and adding pointers to arr ? –  user34920 Mar 7 '14 at 1:28
    
I just noticed that as well and changed the code (a second before seeing your answer) but it runs the same way. However this was an error, no doubt. –  user34920 Mar 7 '14 at 1:30

You never allocated for the final NULL pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
arr[i+1]=NULL, just after the for loop in main. I always allocate i+1 for the new memory so after leaving the for loop in main i can set the last cell to NULL. –  user34920 Mar 7 '14 at 2:06
    
@user34920 you never allocated space for it. –  Cramer Mar 7 '14 at 2:06
    
I've changed the code. Runs the same I'm afraid. I am able to get to the line that causes the problem but I did not manage to see the array of pointers in such a way that I'll be able to see if something is pointing wrong. –  user34920 Mar 7 '14 at 2:25
    
@user34920, we're not here to debug for you sorry but rather to answer specific questions. You now know much more than before, see if you can debug it yourself, or perhaps find a forum or IRC. –  Cramer Mar 7 '14 at 2:28

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