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Is there a way for gcc/g++ to dump its preprocessor defines from the command line? I mean things like __GNUC__, __STDC__, and so on.

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4 Answers

up vote 97 down vote accepted

Yes, use -E -dM options instead of -c. Example (outputs them to stdout):

 gcc -dM -E - < /dev/null

From the gcc manual:

Instead of the normal output, generate a list of `#define' directives for all the macros defined during the execution of the preprocessor, including predefined macros. This gives you a way of finding out what is predefined in your version of the preprocessor. Assuming you have no file foo.h, the command

touch foo.h; cpp -dM foo.h

will show all the predefined macros.

If you use -dM without the -E option, -dM is interpreted as a synonym for -fdump-rtl-mach.

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gcc exists on systems where /dev/null means nothing. –  Pavel Jan 12 at 1:29
    
@Pavel then you can use an empty file, either with gcc or the preprocessor - cpp. –  philant Jan 12 at 9:16
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I added a more portable approach as an alternative answer: echo | gcc -dM -E - works on windows as well. –  Pavel Jan 13 at 20:30
    
Is it possible to determine where (i.e., in which file) those defines came from? –  edam Apr 17 at 14:18
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I usually do it this way:

$ gcc -dM -E - < /dev/null

Note that some preprocessor defines are dependent on command line options - you can test these by adding the relevant options to the above command line. For example, to see which SSE3/SSE4 options are enabled by default:

$ gcc -dM -E - < /dev/null | grep SSE[34]
#define __SSE3__ 1
#define __SSSE3__ 1

and then compare this when -msse4 is specified:

$ gcc -dM -E -msse4 - < /dev/null | grep SSE[34]
#define __SSE3__ 1
#define __SSE4_1__ 1
#define __SSE4_2__ 1
#define __SSSE3__ 1

Similarly you can see which options differ between two different sets of command line options, e.g. compare preprocessor defines for optimisation levels -O0 (none) and -O3 (full):

$ gcc -dM -E -O0 - < /dev/null > /tmp/O0.txt
$ gcc -dM -E -O3 - < /dev/null > /tmp/O3.txt
$ sdiff -s /tmp/O0.txt /tmp/O3.txt 
#define __NO_INLINE__ 1        <
                               > #define __OPTIMIZE__ 1
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Late answer - I found the other answers useful - and wanted to add a bit extra.


How do I dump preprocessor macros coming from a particular header file?

echo "#include <sys/socket.h>" | gcc -E -dM -

In particular, I wanted to see what SOMAXCONN was defined to on my system. I know I could just open up the standard header file, but sometimes I have to search around a bit to find the header file locations. Instead I can just use this one-liner:

$ echo "#include <sys/socket.h>" | gcc -E -dM - | grep SOMAXCONN
#define SOMAXCONN 128
$ 
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echo | gcc -dM -E -

for systems that do not have /dev/null (windows for example)

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Oh, but Windows has NUL :-) –  rubenvb Jan 29 at 8:47
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@rubenvb it's irrelevant. the point is to have cmd line that works equally well on windows and unix at least. If you use NUL, you are back to square one: it won't work on systems that do not have it. –  Pavel Jan 29 at 18:42
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