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I look at the manual but can't seem to find the answer.

What is the default visibility in PHP for functions without a visibility declaration. Does PHP have a package visibility like in Java? Example:

class test {
  -- is go public or private?
  function go() {

  }
}

The reason I asked because I've seen many constructors code written:

function __construct() and some public function __construct(). Are they equivalent?

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5 Answers

up vote 54 down vote accepted

Default is public.

Class methods may be defined as public, private, or protected. Methods declared without any explicit visibility keyword are defined as public.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.visibility.php

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Default visibility is public for methods inside the php classes

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Default visibility is PUBLIC

Source

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Default is public. It's a good practice to allways include it, however, PHP 4 supported classes without access modifiers, so it's common to see no usage of them on legacy code.

And no, PHP has no package visibility, mainly because until recently PHP had no packages.

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1  
Why is it "a good practice to always include it"? –  Ian Oct 9 '12 at 18:57
3  
@Ian: I would say because "explicit is better than implicit" (as the Zen of python says). It causes other programmers to waste brain cycles wondering if the constructor is private or public or what. If people always used access modifiers the original poster might not even have asked this question. –  User Oct 15 '12 at 21:27
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The default is public. The reason probably is backwards compatibility as old code expects it to be public (it would stop working if it weren't public).

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