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I have the following table, which is actually the minimal example of the result of multiple joined tables. I now would like to group by 'person_ID' and get all the 'value' entries in one row, sorted after the feature_ID.

person_ID  | feature_ID | value
123        | 1          | 1.1
123        | 2          | 1.2
123        | 3          | 1.3
123        | 4          | 1.2
124        | 1          | 1.0
124        | 2          | 1.1
...

The result should be:

123  |  1.1  |  1.2  | 1.3  |  1.2
124  |  1.0  |  1.1  | ...

There should exist an elegant SQL query solution, which I can neither come up with, nor find it.

For fast reconstruction that would be the example data:

create table example(person_ID integer, feature_ID integer, value float);
insert into  example(person_ID, feature_ID, value) values
  (123,1,1.1),
  (123,2,1.2),
  (123,3,1.3),
  (123,4,1.2),
  (124,1,1.0),
  (124,2,1.1),
  (124,3,1.2),
  (124,4,1.4); 

Edit: Every person has 6374 entries in the real life application.

I am using a PostgreSQL 8.3.23 database, but I think that should probably be solvable with standard SQL.

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1  
Is the column value feature_ID fixed from 1 to 4? – TechDo Mar 7 '14 at 9:49
    
If you mean that every person has the same amount of rows in this table, than yes. Though in real life it runs from 0 to 6373. – Exocom Mar 7 '14 at 9:52

Data bases aren't much at transposing. There is a nebulous column growth issue at hand, I mean how does the data base deal with a variable number of columns? It's not a spread sheet.

This transposing of sorts is normally done in the report writer, not in SQL.

... or in a program, like in php.

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