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I am having 2 threads Thread1 and Thread2. And I do have a function for a peripheral read or write. Say a SPI read or Write function. Both the threads are using SPI functions at some instances. Since the threads are concurrent in nature, is there any possibility for both the threads try to access the function at the same time. That is the Thread1 one wants to write 0x10 0x25 to the SPI. And The Thread2 wants to write 0x20 0x56. If any synchronization mechanism is not used, is there a possibility of writing wrong sequence to the SPI buffer ?

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1  
Yes, this possibility exists. You would better use a Mutex here! –  barak manos Mar 7 at 11:22
    
ie, a mutex lock in start of the function and an unlock at the end of the function rite? –  SilentCat Mar 7 at 11:25
1  
Exactly. Call Mutex-Get at the beginning of the SPI_Read routine, and Mutex-Put at the end of the SPI_Read routine. In addition, initialize this Mutex to inherit-priority, in order to allow it to solve a 3-thread deadlock using priority-inversion. –  barak manos Mar 7 at 11:28
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Not a typo. Suppose you have 3 threads with priorities High, Med and Low. Now, suppose the Low-priority thread performs an SPI-read request, thus acquiring the SPI mutex. Then, the Med-priority thread awakes (for whatever reason), and immediately switched into action (because its priority is higher than that of the currently executing thread). Finally, the High-priority thread awakes performs an SPI-read request. Since the SPI mutex has already been acquired by the Low-priority thread, the High-priority thread is then blocked. –  barak manos Mar 7 at 11:45
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So essentially, the Med-priority thread is "preferred" over the High-priority thread. Please note that the SPI is used only by the Low-priority thread and the High-priority thread. The Med-priority thread has nothing to do with it. Mutexes can solve this deadlock using priority-inversion. –  barak manos Mar 7 at 11:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider your SPI a shared resource (critical section), which must be mutually exclusive.

Here is the general scheme for preventing a context-switch during SPI-access operations:

static pthread_mutex_t _mutex;

void SPI_init()
{
    ...
    pthread_mutex_init(&_mutex);
    ...
}

void SPI_read(...)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&_mutex);
    ...
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&_mutex);
}


void SPI_write(...)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&_mutex);
    ...
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&_mutex);
}
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One more thing @barack. You just mentioned "initialize this Mutex to inherit-priority" in an older comment. Is this taken care here –  SilentCat Mar 7 at 13:54
1  
@SilentCat: No, it isn't. The above is just a general scheme. You need to look into Linux API and find the exact details for mutex-initialization. –  barak manos Mar 7 at 18:16
    
Ok. Thanks. @barak –  SilentCat Mar 7 at 23:43

Threads can be scheduled in any order. So, yes you can write wrong sequence to the peripheral registers.

And so, to avoid that use synchronization primitives!

See this basic tutorial on how to use mutex: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/05/c-mutex-examples/

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@brockenfoot can u please suggest a method to avoid this situation.? –  SilentCat Mar 7 at 11:27
    
Check the link that I have posted . –  brokenfoot Mar 7 at 11:31

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