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I want to find out how many times a certain pattern in columns one two and three corresponds to a certain value in the fourth column (class). my data.frame looks as follows:

one <- c(-1, 1, 1, -1, -1, 1, 1, 1, 1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, 1, 1, 1, -1, -1, 1)
two <- c(0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1)
three <- c(0, 0, 0, 0, -1, 0, 0, 0, 0, -1, -1, 0, -1, -1, 0, 0, 0, -1, -1, 0)
class <- c(0, 1, 1, 0, -1, -1,  1,  0,  1, -1,  1, 0, -1, -1,  1,  0,  1, -1, -1, 1)

mydf <- data.frame(one, two, three, class)
mydf

   one two three class
1   -1   0     0     0
2    1   1     0     1
3    1   1     0     1
4   -1   0     0     0
5   -1   0    -1    -1
6    1   1     0    -1
7    1   1     0     1
8    1   1     0     0
9    1   1     0     1
10  -1   0    -1    -1
11  -1   0    -1     1
12  -1   0     0     0
13  -1   0    -1    -1
14  -1   0    -1    -1
15   1   1     0     1
16   1   1     0     0
17   1   1     0     1
18  -1   0    -1    -1
19  -1   0    -1    -1
20   1   1     0     1

# column one contains only value 1 or -1
# column two contains only value 1 and 0
# column three contains only values 0 and -1
# column class contains all values 1, 0 and -1

columns one two and three should be seen as a seperate table. with the values 0, 1, -1 there are 8 possible patterns for each row.

pattern1:   -1   0   -1
pattern2:   -1   0    0
pattern3:   -1   1   -1
pattern4:   -1   1    0
pattern5:    1   0   -1
pattern6:    1   0    0
pattern7:    1   1   -1
pattern8:    1   1   -1

i want to find out how many times each pattern corresponds to a 1, 0 and -1 in the last column (class). how can i do that?? i was thinking if i had characters instead of numbers (e.g. 1=a, 0=b, -1=c) i could merge the columns one two three into a single column containing a certain term (eg. abc, acb, bac, bca,...). then i could find out how many times the term abc corresponds to a 1, 0 and -1 in the fourth column. one could even merge columns one to four and count the number of rows containing the resulting terms (abca, abcb, abcc, acba, acbb,...) i'd be happy if someone knows a direct (and more elegant) way to do that! Thank you very much!!

EDIT / NEW TASK:

# with your answers i get:

x <- do.call(paste, expand.grid(lapply(mydf[-4], unique)))

## Paste together the first three columns
y <- do.call(paste, mydf[-4])

## Tabulate
x <- factor(x)
table1 <- table(pattern = x[match(y, x)], value = mydf[, 4])
table1
          value
pattern  -1 0 1
 -1 0 -1  6 0 1
 -1 0 0   0 3 0
 -1 1 -1  0 0 0
 -1 1 0   0 0 0
 1 0 -1   0 0 0
 1 0 0    0 0 0
 1 1 -1   0 0 0
 1 1 0    1 2 7

my new task is the following: i get a new data.frame with only columns one two and three, but without column 4. e.g.

one.new <- c(-1, -1, -1, 1, 1)
two.new <- c(1, 1, 0, 1, 0) 
three.new <- c(-1, 0, 0, -1, 0) 
mydf.new <- data.frame(one.new, two.new, three.new)
mydf.new

    one.new two.new three.new
# 1      -1       1        -1
# 2      -1       1         0
# 3      -1       0         0
# 4       1       1        -1
# 5       1       0         0

i now want to get a fourth column, that assigns the pattern of each row to the class-value with the highest frequency in table1. so for example the first row will get a value of -1 in the forth column.

# first row of table1:

#          value
# pattern  -1 0 1
#  -1 0 -1  6 0 1

(there are patterns that don't occur in this example. in this case, there should be a 0 in the fourth column)

does anyone have an idea on how to do that? Thank you!!

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps, something like table(do.call(paste, mydf[-4]), mydf[[4]]), which is actually in the concept you had in mind, could help? –  alexis_laz Mar 7 '14 at 16:57
    
@ everyone: sorry guys my english.. i always mess up columns and rows! and sorry for the other mistakes, i'm a bit in a mess:)! now it should be ok! –  cptn Mar 7 '14 at 17:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is my interpretation of what you're asking:

## Create the combinations that are possible
x <- do.call(paste, 
             expand.grid(lapply(mydf[-4], unique)))

## Paste together the first three columns
y <- do.call(paste, mydf[-4])

## Tabulate
table(pattern = x[match(y, x)], value = mydf[, 4])
#          value
# pattern   -1 0 1
#   -1 0 0   0 3 0
#   -1 0 -1  6 0 1
#   1 1 0    1 2 7

Edit: Updated to match final data and fix a typo...


UPDATE

To get all 8 patterns in the output, factor "x" before tabulating. Continuing from above:

x <- factor(x)
table(pattern = x[match(y, x)], value = mydf[, 4])
#          value
# pattern   -1 0 1
#   -1 0 0   0 3 0
#   1 0 0    0 0 0
#   -1 0 -1  6 0 1
#   1 0 -1   0 0 0
#   -1 1 0   0 0 0
#   1 1 0    1 2 7
#   -1 1 -1  0 0 0
#   1 1 -1   0 0 0
share|improve this answer
    
yes this looks good!! but why do i only get a 3 x 3 table? i should get a table with 8 rows (patterns) and three columns (values 1, 0, -1) –  cptn Mar 7 '14 at 17:32
    
@cptn, you'd have to use factor to get all the possible levels. See my update. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 7 '14 at 17:36

Here are some ways. They use mydf as constructed in the code of the question (which differs from the displayed version of mydf). There is one row for each pattern and class combination that appears in the data and the last column shows how many of such combinations exist.

1) aggregate

aggregate(count ~., cbind(count = 1, mydf), length)

giving:

  one two three class count
1  -1  -1    -1    -1     6
2   1   1     0    -1     1
3  -1  -1     0     0     3
4   1   1     0     0     2
5  -1  -1    -1     1     1
6   1   1     0     1     7

2) sqldf

library(sqldf)
sqldf("select one, two, three, class, count(*)
       from mydf 
       group by class, one, two, three")

giving:

  one two three class count(*)
1  -1  -1    -1    -1        6
2   1   1     0    -1        1
3  -1  -1     0     0        3
4   1   1     0     0        2
5  -1  -1    -1     1        1
6   1   1     0     1        7

3) data.table

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(mydf, key = "class,one,two,three")
DT[, list(count = .N), by = key(DT)]

   class one two three count
1:    -1  -1  -1    -1     6
2:    -1   1   1     0     1
3:     0  -1  -1     0     3
4:     0   1   1     0     2
5:     1  -1  -1    -1     1
6:     1   1   1     0     7

4) reshape2. If you prefer the class along the top then try this:

library(reshape2)
dcast(mydf, ... ~ class, fun = length)

Using class as value column: use value.var to override.
  one two three -1 0 1
1  -1  -1    -1  6 0 1
2  -1  -1     0  0 3 0
3   1   1     0  1 2 7

ADDED aggregate, data.table, reshape2.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. After I saw your sqldf approach, I was about to suggest aggregate and "dplyr" (mydf %.% group_by(class, one, two, three) %.% summarise(x = length(class))) but I think you've got things covered! –  Ananda Mahto Mar 7 '14 at 17:35

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