Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am reading a book called C for Java Programmers. It gives an example about nameless structs that I do not undestand. It says that this is valid:

struct{
 int val1, val2;
 double val3;
} s1,s2;

  s1.val1 = 5;
  s2.val3 = 4.6;

If structs are similar to objects in Java, why can't I just say val1 = 5 and val2 = 4.6? What is the point of s1 and s2?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
The code shown isn't valid C. – alk Mar 7 '14 at 18:24
    
Structs are similar to classes. The fact that it has no name makes no difference. – SLaks Mar 7 '14 at 18:24
2  
@alk It is a valid extract... – ThoAppelsin Mar 7 '14 at 18:25
1  
Well, think about it: when I say val1 = 5 then whose val1 did I just set, s1's or s2's? The member-names exist only inside the struct, similar to public fields in a Java class: when I'm outside the class and I want to set the value of a field I can only access the field via the instance. – Kninnug Mar 7 '14 at 18:31
1  
@Blossom96 yes, just like with structs that do have names. The only difference with nameless structs is that s1 and s2 are now the only instances since you'd need the name of the struct to make more. – Kninnug Mar 7 '14 at 18:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

structs are similar to classes in the sense that you can view the members of a struct as public fields of a class. Because this struct has no name you only have the instances at the end of the struct's declaration (s1 and s2) because you'd need the struct's name to make instances in other places.

In order to assign values to the members of the instances you need to access them through the instance (s1 or s2).

You can compare it with the following Java scenario: you have a class with three public fields: val1, val2 and val3 and you have two instances of your class: s1 and s2. In order to assign values to your instances you need to access the members through the instances:

s1.val1 = 5;
s2.val3 = 3.14;

The fact that the struct is nameless only means that you can't make other instances besides the ones at the end of the declaration, but has no effect on how you access the members of instances.

share|improve this answer
    
okay this is making sense. I just have one more question for clarification. You said "Because this struct has no name you only have the two instances s1 and s2." So if I added s3 and s4, then I would have four instances right? I guess I am just trying to make sure that you don't mean that you don't mean nameless structs can only have up to 2 instances. – JustBlossom Mar 7 '14 at 18:43
    
@Blossom96 I suppose that was a bit ambiguously worded: you can indeed add more instances at the end of the declaration, so you could ineed add s3 and s4. But with a nameless struct you can only make instances at the end of the struct's declaration. Hope my edit clarified it. – Kninnug Mar 7 '14 at 18:46

To initialise a struct variable you need to add an appropriate initialiser:

struct 
{
  int val1, val2;
  double val3;
} s1 =
{
  1, 2, 3.
};
share|improve this answer

With this code you are creating (or instantiating in OO terms) two distinct nameless struct "objects". It is equivalent to:

struct name{
  int val1, val2;
  double val3;
}

struct name s1;
struct name s2;

s1.val1 = 5;
s2.val3 = 4.6;

if you want to give a name to the struct. Alternatively, you can create structures with initializers as alk suggested.

share|improve this answer

Coming from java you can think of a C struct like a class without member functions:

//java:
class SomeData1 {
    public int val1;
    public int val2;
    public double val3;
}

So then you'd do:

// java:
SomeData1 s1= new SomeData1();
s1.val1 = 5;

In C you can use a struct like this by naming the structure:

// C:
typedef struct {
  int val1, val2;
  double val3;
} SomeData1;

Then you can set values:

// C:
SomeData1 s1;
s1.val1 = 5;

But it's also possible to use a structure "nameless" as you've seen in the example you posted:

struct{
 int val1, val2;
 double val3;
} s1,s2;

In this case you can still access the s1 and s2 structure's values:

s1.val1 = 5;

But you can't refer to the original structure... can't make additional instances (however many you declare initially, are the only ones you are going to get) of it. IMO the nameless structure isn't very useful.

share|improve this answer

A struct in C is like an object in Java. But C has no classes, so there really isn't a need to name the type. I.e., you could say:

struct something {
   int a, b;
   double c;
};

and later say:

struct something s1, s2;

s1.a = 42;
s1.c = 2.14;
s2 = s1;

In the common case that you only define a few objects of that type, it may remain nameless (as in your snippet). The members a, b, c of s1 and s2 are different, just like if you have several objects of the same type in Java their members are separate values.

share|improve this answer

That is a nice and elegant way of doing so:

struct s {
  int val1, val2;
  double val3;
};

struct s s1 = {
  .val1 = 1,
  .val3 = 3.1444
};

s1.val2 will be set to 0 by the compiler. It is commonly used in linux kernel source code.

share|improve this answer

By writing:

struct {
    int val1, val2;
    double val3;
} s1, s2;

inside, let's say, the main function; you declare two variables named s1 and s2, which have the type struct { int val1, val2; double val3; } . This struct { int val1, val2; double val3; } is really similar to int or char or float , you can just think of it as a little longer type.

Now that you have the s1 and s2 , you can play with them, since they are variables, right? Well, if you had given a name to your struct then you'd have two ways of doing that, but since it doesn't have a name, you only have one way of doing it, and that is by changing individual contents that your s1 and s2 has. For example:

s1.val1 = 6;
s2.val3 = 5.2314;

If you had given a name to the struct , you'd have one another way of playing with its variables. Let's say you had given a name abc to it, like this:

struct abc {
    int val1, val2;
    double val3;
} s1, s2;

In that case, you can play around with the s1 and s2 as a whole, like this:

s1 = (struct abc) { 123, 234, 1.234 };
s2 = (struct abc) { 12, 34 };

For s1 , it assigns 123 to val1 , 234 to val2 and 1.234 to val3 . For s2 , similar for first 2, and it assigns a 0 for the 3rd variable, because I've omitted that one.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.