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This works fine for a non-member function. How can I change it to be able to perform the same operation with a member function. I have tried the "function pointers" technique, and it was not efficient in terms of performance.

template <typename Func>
int f(int a, Func somefunc) {
  somefunc(a);
  return 0;
}
...
f(5,myfoo);

I want to be able to do this:

int myClass::mybar() {    
  f(5,myfoo); //where myfoo is actually "myClass::myfoo" here. 
              //I want myClass to be the template class. 
}

How can I define a template class and make its member-function template as well, such that f works with any class and any member-function?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What is this "function pointers" technique you speak of? – Brian Mar 7 '14 at 19:58
    
have you tried to overload your function with another template parameter for the class ? Then the function's type will be Class::Func – Geoffroy Mar 7 '14 at 19:58
    
@BrianBi I mean function pointer in c++! like passing the address of the function – towi_parallelism Mar 7 '14 at 20:05
    
@Geoffroy: If you mean template <typename Class, typename Func>, I have tried it. and then instead of Func, I have used Class::Func. did not work! – towi_parallelism Mar 7 '14 at 20:06
1  
In C++ using function pointers is rarely reasonable, they are usually used as a bridge between C++ and C libraries and sometimes as "optimization". C++ has more sophisticated tools than function pointers. – pasztorpisti Mar 7 '14 at 20:22

Wait... Hammer Time

You mean do something like this??

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

void my_int_func(int x)
{
    printf( "%d\n", x );
}

void my_string_func(std::string x)
{
    std::cout << x << std::endl;
}

template <typename type, typename Func>
int f(type a, Func somefunc) {
  somefunc(a);
  return 0;
}

int main()
{
    void (*foo)(int);
    void (*bar)(std::string);
    /* the ampersand is actually optional */
    foo = &my_int_func;
    bar = &my_string_func;

    f(5, foo);
    f(std::string("thing"), bar);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is again function pointer. right? I have tried this. No good performance when called so many times. – towi_parallelism Mar 7 '14 at 20:21
    
Performance? They're more of a tool for saving code, not really for improving performance. – Claudiordgz Mar 7 '14 at 20:22
    
That is exactly what I am concerned about. Having an implementation that does not degrade the performance. Anyway, thanks for the code! – towi_parallelism Mar 7 '14 at 20:24
1  
I'm just gonna leave this right here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Policy-based_design – Claudiordgz Mar 7 '14 at 20:25
    
BTW... usually more code quantityt means better performance (that's why compilers unroll loops)... but it also means harder to read code. Watch out for performance improvements. – Claudiordgz Mar 7 '14 at 20:26

OK, now comes the said truth: Member pointers are also pointers (OK, sometimes they are just offsets, and it can be even more compliated in case of multiple/virtual inheritance...). And now maybe a possible solution although I don't know what is your actual use case for passing a member function pointer to a template method of a template...

template <typename T>
class C
{
public:
    C()
    {
        f(5, &C::f);
    }

    template <typename Func>
    int f(int a, Func somefunc)
    {
        (this->*somefunc)(a);
        return 0;
    }
    void f(int i)
    {
        printf("%s(%d)\n", __FUNCTION__, i);
    }
    void g(int i)
    {
        printf("%s(%d)\n", __FUNCTION__, i);
    }
};

int main()
{
    C<int> c;
    c.f(6, &C<int>::g);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I want f to be an API. so it is not aware of the class or its member functions implementations. – towi_parallelism Mar 7 '14 at 23:01
    
@TOWI_Parallelism in that case you have to pass an instance pointer too to f() along with the member pointer because a member pointer is useless without an instance pointer. An instance pointer + method pointer together is basically a delegate (delegate == pointer to a method of an actual instance) that is unfortunately unsupported by C++ however in C++11 you have several options to achieve your goal depending on what you actually want to do. – pasztorpisti Mar 7 '14 at 23:06
    
@TOWI_Parallelism My previous statement about delegates isn't totally correct, a delegate isn't necessarily an instance pointer + method. A delegate is simply a callable object, it is like a function but its actual implementation can actually be backed by a normal function or optionally a method with a bound instance pointer / this pointer parameter. – pasztorpisti Mar 7 '14 at 23:15
    
Are you sure it is not possible in C++? – towi_parallelism Mar 7 '14 at 23:20
1  
@TOWI_Parallelism C++ doesn't natively support delegates but you can simulate them nicely with C++11 features. The question is: What do you want to achieve? Maybe all you need is lambda/std::function, maybe some variadic template magic. The goal is to provide an easy to use API that results in nice code when someone writes code on top of your API. – pasztorpisti Mar 7 '14 at 23:23

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