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I have a generic list of objects in C#, and wish to clone the list. The items within the list are cloneable, but there doesn't seem to be an option to do list.Clone().

Is there an easy way around this?

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21  
You should say if you're looking for a deep copy or a shallow copy –  orip Nov 23 '08 at 10:25
3  
What are deep and shallow copies? –  Colonel Panic Sep 27 '12 at 11:03
1  
@ColonelPanic en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_copy#Shallow_copy –  Nathan Koop Oct 13 '12 at 20:24
    
@orip Isn't clone() by definition a deep copy? In C# you can pass pointers around easily with =, I thought. –  Chris Dec 18 '12 at 20:51
6  
@Chris a shallow copy copies one level deeper than pointer copy. Eg a shallow copy of a list will have the same elements, but will be a different list. –  orip Dec 18 '12 at 22:15

14 Answers 14

up vote 139 down vote accepted

You can use an extension method.

static class Extensions
{
    public static IList<T> Clone<T>(this IList<T> listToClone) where T: ICloneable
    {
        return listToClone.Select(item => (T)item.Clone()).ToList();
    }
}
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30  
I think List.ConvertAll might do this in faster time, since it can pre-allocate the entire array for the list, versus having to resize all the time. –  MichaelGG Oct 21 '08 at 17:43
    
@MichaelGG, what if you don't want to Convert but just Clone/Duplicate the items in the list? Would this work? || var clonedList = ListOfStrings.ConvertAll(p => p); –  IbrarMumtaz Aug 17 at 15:42

If your elements are value types, then you can just do:

List<YourType> newList = new List<YourType>(oldList);

However, if they are reference types and you want a deep copy (assuming your elements properly implement ICloneable), you could do something like this:

List<ICloneable> oldList = new List<ICloneable>();
List<ICloneable> newList = new List<ICloneable>(oldList.Count);

oldList.ForEach((item) =>
    {
        newList.Add((ICloneable)item.Clone());
    });

Obviously, replace ICloneable in the above generics and cast with whatever your element type is that implements ICloneable.

If your element type doesn't support ICloneable but does have a copy-constructor, you could do this instead:

List<YourType> oldList = new List<YourType>();
List<YourType> newList = new List<YourType>(oldList.Count);

oldList.ForEach((item)=>
    {
        newList.Add(new YourType(item));
    });

Personally, I would avoid ICloneable because of the need to guarantee a deep copy of all members. Instead, I'd suggest the copy-constructor or a factory method like YourType.CopyFrom(YourType itemToCopy) that returns a new instance of YourType.

Any of these options could be wrapped by a method (extension or otherwise).

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1  
I think List<T>.ConvertAll might look nicer than creating a new list and doing a foreach+add. –  MichaelGG Oct 21 '08 at 17:42
    
Good point. I must admit, I'm still coming to grips with all the LINQ calls myself. –  Jeff Yates Oct 22 '08 at 15:57
    
+1 So in summary, it is impossible to provide a deep clone function for a Generic.List. Is that right? –  Dimitri C. Sep 9 '10 at 10:12
3  
Why not use the AddRange method? (newList.AddRange(oldList.Select(i => i.Clone()) or newList.AddRange(oldList.Select(i => new YourType(i)) –  phoog Dec 21 '10 at 16:00
3  
@phoog: I think that it is a little less readable/understandable when scanning the code, that's all. Readability wins for me. –  Jeff Yates Dec 22 '10 at 15:18
public static object DeepClone(object obj) 
{
  object objResult = null;
  using (MemoryStream  ms = new MemoryStream())
  {
    BinaryFormatter  bf =   new BinaryFormatter();
    bf.Serialize(ms, obj);

    ms.Position = 0;
    objResult = bf.Deserialize(ms);
  }
  return objResult;
}

This is one way to do it with C# and framework 2.0. Your object require to be [Serializable()]... This method Serialize and unserialize. The goal is to lost all reference and build new one.

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8  
+1 - i like this answer - it is quick, dirty, nasty and very effective. I used in silverlight, and used the DataContractSerializer as the BinarySerializer was not available. Who needs to write pages of object cloning code when you can just do this? :) –  slugster Mar 2 '10 at 11:52
3  
I like this. While it's nice to do things "right", quick and dirty often comes in handy. –  Odrade Dec 15 '10 at 18:11
1  
Quick! but: Why dirty? –  raiserle Dec 12 '13 at 11:54

For a shallow copy, you can instead use the GetRange method of the generic List class.

List<int> oldList = new List<int>( );
// Populate oldList...

List<int> newList = oldList.GetRange(0, oldList.Count);

Quoted from: Generics Recipes

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13  
You can also achieve this by using the List<T>'s contructor to specify a List<T> from which to copy from. eg var shallowClonedList = new List<MyObject>(originalList); –  Arkiliknam Feb 16 '12 at 14:58
1  
I often use List<int> newList = oldList.ToList(). Same effect. However, Arkiliknam's solution is best for readability in my opinion. –  Dan Oct 25 '12 at 18:27

Or you can simply use ToList() on the List, it makes a copy of the list and passes it on to the new List.

var newList = oldList.ToList();
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4  
That was what I was looking for. And I actually don't know why nobody came up with this and everbody does nasty or crazy things above. +1 Very good! –  SlapY Sep 30 '13 at 22:34
15  
This makes a copy of this, but still references the original list. –  Tommo1977 Nov 27 '13 at 12:09
    
I ran into exceptions when I tried this. So I built extension methods. (One for each type of the 3 types I needed to work with. Listn<int>, List<Guid>, and List<string> –  Wonderbird Jul 8 at 22:17

After a slight modification you can also clone:

public static T DeepClone<T>(T obj)
{
    T objResult;
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
        bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
        ms.Position = 0;
        objResult = (T)bf.Deserialize(ms);
    }
    return objResult;
}
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If you only care about value types...

And you know the type:

List<int> newList = new List<int>(oldList);

If you don't know the type before, you'll need a helper function:

List<T> Clone<T>(IEnumerable<T> oldList)
{
    return newList = new List<T>(oldList);
}

The just:

List<string> myNewList = Clone(myOldList);
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9  
This doesn't clone the elements. –  Jeff Yates Oct 21 '08 at 16:57
    
Works for me, thanks! (for a float list) –  M Granja Sep 18 '12 at 13:05
7  
Keep in mind, this only works for value types. –  Dan Oct 25 '12 at 18:29

Use AutoMapper (or whatever mapping lib you prefer) to clone is simple and a lot maintainable.

Define your mapping:

Mapper.CreateMap<YourType, YourType>();

Do the magic:

YourTypeList.ConvertAll(Mapper.Map<YourType, YourType>);
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public class CloneableList<T> : List<T>, ICloneable where T : ICloneable
{
  public object Clone()
  {
    var clone = new List<T>();
    ForEach(item => clone.Add((T)item.Clone()));
    return clone;
  }
}
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Nice idea Peter! –  Jeremy Child Jul 31 '12 at 4:41
public static Object CloneType(Object objtype)
{
    Object lstfinal = new Object();

    using (MemoryStream memStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        BinaryFormatter binaryFormatter = new BinaryFormatter(null, new StreamingContext(StreamingContextStates.Clone));
        binaryFormatter.Serialize(memStream, objtype); memStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        lstfinal = binaryFormatter.Deserialize(memStream);
    }

    return lstfinal;
}
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namespace extension
{
 public class ext
 {
 public static List<double> clone(this List<double> t)
        {
            List<double> kop = new List<double>();
            int x;
            for (x = 0; x < t.Count; x++)
            {
                kop.Add(t[x]);
            }
            return kop;
        }
   };

}

you can use extension method

you can clone all objects by using their value type memebers for exapmle

consider this class

public class matrix
{

   public List<List<double>> mat;
   public int rows,cols;
   public matrix clone()
   { 
     // create new object
     matrix copy = new matrix();
     // firstly I can direcly copy rows and cols because they are value types
     copy.rows = this.rows;  
     copy.cols = this.cols;
     // but now I can no t direclty copy mat because it is not value type so
     int x;
     // I assume I have clone method for List<double>
     for(x=0;x<this.mat.count;x++)
     {
         copy.mat.Add(this.mat[x].clone());
     }
     // then mat is cloned
     return copy; // and copy of orginal is returned 
   }

};

note that if you do something to copy (or clone) it will not affect the orginal object :D

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If you have already referenced Newtonsoft.Json in your project and your objects are serializeable you could always use:

List<T> newList = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(listToCopy))

Possibly not the most efficient way to do it, but unless you're doing it 100s of 1000s of times you may not even notice the speed difference.

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I've made for my own some extension which converts ICollection of items that not implement IClonable

static class CollectionExtensions
{
    public static ICollection<T> Clone<T>(this ICollection<T> listToClone)
    {
        var array = new T[listToClone.Count];
        listToClone.CopyTo(array,0);
        return array.ToList();
    }
}
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Another way is to use LINQ extension method Enumerable.ToList<TSource>

List<T> oldList = new List<T>();
List<T> newList = oldList.ToList<T>();

This will create deep copy of oldList;

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