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Why is it that in a C# switch statement, for a variable used in multiple cases, you only declare it in the first case?

For example, the following throws the error "A local variable named 'variable' is already defined in this scope".

switch (Type)
{
    case Type.A:
            string variable = "x";
                break;
    case Type.B:
            string variable = "y";
                break;
}

However, per the logic, the initial declaration should not be hit if the type is Type.B. Do all variables within a switch statement exist in a single scope, and are they created/allocated before any logic is processed?

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the really ugly things is that people do this: switch (Type) { case Type.A: string variable = "x"; break; case Type.B: variable = "y"; break; } –  giammin Jul 17 at 9:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I believe it has to do with the overall scope of the variable, it is a block level scope that is defined at the switch level.

Personally if you are setting a value to something inside a switch in your example for it to really be of any benefit, you would want to declare it outside the switch anyway.

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22  
Follow the braces. A variable only exists inside the innermost braces in which the variable is first declared. –  Jarrett Meyer Oct 21 '08 at 17:02

If you want a variable scoped to a particular case, simply enclose the case in its own block:

switch (Type)
{
    case Type.A:
    {
        string variable = "x";
        /* Do other stuff with variable */
    }
    break;

    case Type.B:
    {
        string variable = "y";
        /* Do other stuff with variable */
    }
    break;
}
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Yes, the scope is the entire switch block - unfortunately, IMO. You can always add braces within a single case, however, to create a smaller scope. As for whether they're created/allocated - the stack frame has enough space for all the local variables in a method (leaving aside the complexities of captured variables). It's not like that space is allocated during the method's execution.

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2  
With all due respect, your Skeetness, please don't recommend adding scope to a switch case block. If you need a new scope for that block, odds are you're doing too much in the block. Instead, I suggest you recommend the processing be pushed to a function call. –  Randolpho Aug 27 '10 at 14:44
15  
@Randolpho: I think that's too general a statement to make. It could easily just be three or four lines, but affecting two or three local variables - enough for it to be a pain to refactor out into a method call. –  Jon Skeet Aug 27 '10 at 18:19
2  
Agreed, I bumped into this issue more than once, and it was for a processing logic of two or three lines... Puting that in a separate method is just pain. –  Philippe Jan 16 '11 at 16:35
    
As my variable can change a type depends on the switch smaller scope worked great. up vote. –  Maxim Apr 1 '13 at 22:05
2  
@EdwardKarak: Only if you still declare it in a higher scope. If you use braces for both cases, it should be fine. –  Jon Skeet Dec 13 '13 at 7:32

Because their scope is at the switch block. Check here for more info.

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The initialization takes place in the case, but the declaration is effectively done at the top of the scope. (Psuedo-code)

switch (Type)
{
string variable;

    case Type.A:
            variable = "x";
                break;
    case Type.B:
            variable = "y";
                break;
}
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7  
I'm petty sure this code doesn't work –  Jim Beam Jul 22 '11 at 14:47
1  
@Jim, Yes, I'm aware that code doesn't work -- which is why I referred to it as "Pseudo-Code", but it is what is "effectively" done. –  James Curran Apr 14 '13 at 14:06
    
Not quite. Consider that if you remove the breaks you end up with something like: ``` string variable = "x"; variable = "y"; ``` This is a procedural GOTO: for all intents and purposes. The correct code should be something like ``` string myVar; switch(myValue) { case MyEnum.A: myVar = "x"; break; case MyEnum.B: myVar = "Y"; break; } ``` –  percebus Jun 20 at 5:42
    
@percebus - What do you mean by "correct"? In your example, the scope of myVar would be outside of the switch block. Our point is that in these scase, the scope is just the switch block. –  James Curran Jul 1 at 19:25

The variables do share scope in the C# compiler. However, scope doesn't exist in the same way in CIL. As for actual creation / initialization... the .NET memory model lets the compiler move reads / writes a bit as long as simple rules are followed unless the variable is marked as volatile.

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"In My Daaaaays..."

swicth is a really primitive procedural implementation that has been around since the ages of C itself (even before C++).

The whole switch is a block that serves as a scope-contained GOTO: (hence the : in each case). If you took some assembler classes, that might seem familiar.

That is why switch use is most helpful when combining with Enums and not using break in every single case like

switch(mood)
{
    case Mood.BORED:
    case Mood.HAPPY:
        drink(oBeer) // will drink if bored OR happy
break;

    case Mood.SAD: // unnecessary but proofs a concept
    default:
        drink(oCoffee)
break;
}
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