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I'm wrapping a C DLL (which I only have .h's) and I'm stuck with "Attempted to read or write protected memory".

Info:

  • Windows 7 64-bit
  • DLL is 64-bit
  • C# App and Wrapper is 64-bit

Export Def:

#if defined(_WIN32) && !defined(__SYMBIAN32__)
#define EXP_API __cdecl
#else
    #if !defined(__SYMBIAN32__)
        #define EXP_API
    #else
        #define EXP_API EXPORT_C
    #endif
#endif

Here is the C header struct:

typedef struct bufferstrm bufferstrm_tt;

struct bufferstrm
{
  uint32_t  (EXP_API * bytes_usage)(bufferstrm_tt *bs);

  uint8_t * (EXP_API * get_stuff)(bufferstrm_tt *bs, uint32_t length);


  struct implstrm* some_struct;
};

int32_t EXP_API strmParser(struct bufferstrm_tt *bs);

My C# Wrapper:

[DllImport("Parser.dll", EntryPoint = "strmParser", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public static extern int strmParser(ref bufferstrm bs);

// Delegates
[UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public delegate uint BUFSTRM_bytes_usage(ref bufferstrm bs);
[UnmanagedFunctionPointer(CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
public delegate IntPtr BUFSTRM_get_stuff(ref bufferstrm bs, uint length);

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct bufferstrm
{
   public BUFSTRM_bytes_usage bytes_usage;

   public BUFSTRM_get_stuff get_stuff;

   public IntPtr some_struct;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct implstrm
{
   public uint dummy;
}

public static uint test_bytes_usage(ref bufferstrm bs)
{
   return 0;
}

public static IntPtr test_get_stuff(ref bufferstrm bs, uint length)
{
   return IntPtr.Zero;
}

If I use it like this: [Attempted to read or write protected memory]

bufferstrm bs = new bufferstrm();
bs.bytes_usage = BUFSTRM_bytes_usage(test_bytes_usage);
bs.get_stuff = BUFSTRM_get_stuff(test_get_stuff);
implstrm testStruct = new implstrm();
IntPtr ptr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(testStruct)));
Marshal.StructureToPtr(testStruct, ptr, false);
bs.some_struct = ptr;

int hr = strmParser(ref bs);

If I don't set the callbacks it just returns the predicted hr value (which is missing stuff).

Anyone has any idea what am I doing wrong?

Thank you!

EDIT:

Enabling "Unmanaged Code Debuggin" I got "Access violation reading location 0xffffffffffffffff". Does this tell you guys anything?

share|improve this question
    
My first instinct (haven't looked at the code very carefully yet, though) is to double check the calling convention matches on all your delegates/functions/function pointers. –  Cameron Mar 7 at 21:49
    
I've checked and everything is CallingConvention.Cdecl like the DLL headers :/ –  tweellt Mar 7 at 21:53
    
Are you sure the C headers are using cdecl though? From MSDN: On ARM and x64 processors, __cdecl is accepted and ignored by the compiler. –  Cameron Mar 7 at 21:55
1  
We'll need more information about the error, at least a stack trace or some more debugging information. It really seems like the native code is attempting to dereference NULL (as a result of your IntPtr.Zero). I'd suggest modifying your test_get_stuff to instead return a valid pointer to some unmanaged memory (allocate it with Marshal.AllocHGlobal, and use the same size in test_bytes_usage. And don't forget to Marshal.FreeHGlobal after you're done). –  Mark H Mar 8 at 1:05
1  
Also, based on your edit (attempt to read at 0xffffffff... aka, -1), it seems the native code is probably unsafe in that it's using (length-1) to index the last item of the data you're feeding it (which has length 0). Try a non-empty array as I've suggested. –  Mark H Mar 8 at 1:07

1 Answer 1

The obvious mistake in your translation is in the third member of bufferstrm

struct implstrm* some_struct;

This is a pointer to a struct. Based on the name, this struct, provides the actual implementation of the stream. The bufferstrm struct wraps that raw stream with a buffering layer. At least, that's what the names suggest.

Now in the C# code, you translated some_struct as an in-line struct, rather than a pointer. That is obviously wrong. It should be:

public struct bufferstrm
{
   public BUFSTRM_bytes_usage bytes_usage;
   public BUFSTRM_get_stuff get_stuff;    
   public IntPtr some_struct;
}

You'll need to use Marshal.StructureToPtr to create this pointer.

Beyond that, it seems quite plausible that the two functions that you provide are implemented incorrectly. You've given any details of that the functions are expected to do. Perhaps get_stuff is not allowed to return a null pointer. There's no way for us to check any of that because you've only given the prototype of the functions, but omitted details of the semantic rules that the functions must obey.

So I suspect that the delegates you pass are incorrect. But only somebody with knowledge of what they are expected to do can understand how to correct them.

share|improve this answer
    
David I do understand you frustration, because it is mine in the first place. I cannot give what I do not have, as you can see I post de header code, export and c# code. I tried your approach, and might be the first step for the success, but it still returns that nasty exception. You don't have to be so angry about it. –  tweellt Mar 8 at 17:47
1  
I think it's going to be hard without docs. The solution to your problem is to contact the vendors and ask for the docs. –  David Heffernan Mar 8 at 18:21

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