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I have a problem with defining and changing a variable in my code. I am trying to use an oop approach, so I set up a new file in which the specific function set lies. Within this set, I want to define a global variable, whose value can be changed within subsequent functions to then execute certain blocks of code dependent on the new value of the variable. However, I am coming across the problem of only changing the value of the variable within the respective function, whereas the new value cannot be assessed outside to be further processed. Any suggestions?

Thanks a lot!

var functionset = {
x : "",

function1 : function(){
    function(){
        // some code
        function(){
            // some code
            function(){
                x = "new value";
            }
        }
        if(x == "new value"){
            // do something
        } else if(x =="different value"){
            // do something else
        }
    }
},  

}

share|improve this question
    
Are these multiple nested functions? If that's the case, that's much more on the functional than on the oop side –  Renato Zannon Mar 8 '14 at 2:47
    
It would help if you gave a real example of what you are trying to accomplish with this model –  Renato Zannon Mar 8 '14 at 2:48
    
x looks like a property, not a variable. If the namespace is static, you can access by namespace. Otherwise you'll have to consider what this is or some other method of passing the reference. –  Paul S. Mar 8 '14 at 2:49
    
x is not global, its a property of functionset, you would need to use functionset.x=0 –  Patrick Evans Mar 8 '14 at 2:49
    
You have a function (functionset.function1) which is defined as follows: function(){ function(){ ... }}. Calling functionset.function1 doesn't do anything. When you call it, all that happens is that a function is created within the scope of the function call. But defining a function does not mean the function is called/invoked/run. The newly created function isn't called or returned or assigned to a variable (which might mean it could be called later). It's just like writing this: function threePlusSeven() { 3 + 7; }. threePlusSeven doesn't return anything; you need return 3 + 7. –  David Knipe Mar 8 '14 at 2:56

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