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def a(n):
    return max([len(n)] + [a(i) for i in n]) if isinstance(n, list) else 0

this was in a recent test of mine and i just can't get list comprehension down. So basically this function was supposed to return the length of the largest list (which is what i'm assuming based on the correct answers) I would have understood that if it weren't for this part of the function:

+ [a(i) for i in n])

when i see that part, it looks like it adds something to the length of the list it was iterating over. Can someone shed some light on the purpose of that part? more specifically the reason for the addition.

edit: so after looking at it more carefully..it looks like the function puts the length of the first list in a list, then puts the length of the next list and returns the max?... is this how it works?

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1  
That should have been a(i). –  thefourtheye Mar 8 '14 at 2:43
    
sorry that was a typo thanks. –  user3050527 Mar 8 '14 at 2:45
    
This is deliberately obscure. It's all a matter of rewriting the function in your terms (edit: see answer below). –  uʍop ǝpısdn Mar 8 '14 at 2:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This function computes the length of the largest node in a tree (implemented as lists within lists). Perhaps with a bit of renaming and reording, it'll be clearer:

def longest_list_in_tree(tree):
    if not isinstance(tree, list):
        return 0 # This is a leaf-value of the tree, it has "length 0"

    own_length = len(tree)
    longest_descendant_of_each_subtree = [
        longest_list_in_tree(subtree) for subtree in tree
    ]

    return max([own_length] + longest_descendant_of_each_subtree)
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2  
That's beautiful, man. –  Edward Mar 8 '14 at 3:09

The objective of the program is to find the length of the longest list in a list of lists. Lets say you pass a list of lists as input.

b = [[1], [1, 2], [3], [[1, 2, 3], [1]]]

Now, to find the length of the inner lists, we first first have to iterate through the current list. But what if the initial input itself is not a list? We return the length of the element as 0. That checking is done by this part

... if isinstance(n, list) else 0

if n is not an instance of list, we return 0. Now that we are sure that the current item is a list, we get the length of this list len(n). Then, we iterate through the list, like this

[a(i) for i in n]

we get each element of n and recursively call a. Now, if the element is a list, a(i) is expected to return the length of the longest list in it. So, we gather all the lengths of the longest lists in each of the elements, create them as a list and concatenate that with the length of the n. That concatenation is done with

[len(n)] + [a(i) for i in n]

we make len(n) a list by surrounding it with square brackets and + operator will append the lengths we got from all the elements of n. So in every recursed function call, we get something like this

[length of current list,
        max length of sub elements in element 1 of n,
        max length of sub elements in element 2 of n,
        max length of sub elements in element 3 of n,
...
]

then we find the maximum of all those elements and return that to the caller.

To understand this program better, I created a decorator to log the inputs and the corresponding outputs. This might help you understand the recursion better

def logger(f):
    def wrapper(args, level):
        print "\t\t" * level + "Entered with input ", args
        temp = f(args, level)
        print "\t\t" * level + "Leaving with length", temp
        return temp
    return wrapper

@logger
def a(n, lev):
    return max([len(n)] + [a(i, lev+1) for i in n]) if isinstance(n, list) else 0

b = [[1], [1, 2], [3], [[1, 2, 3], [1]]]

print a(b, 0)

and the output is

Entered with input  [[1], [1, 2], [3], [[1, 2, 3], [1]]]
        Entered with input  [1]
                Entered with input  1
                Leaving with length 0
        Leaving with length 1
        Entered with input  [1, 2]
                Entered with input  1
                Leaving with length 0
                Entered with input  2
                Leaving with length 0
        Leaving with length 2
        Entered with input  [3]
                Entered with input  3
                Leaving with length 0
        Leaving with length 1
        Entered with input  [[1, 2, 3], [1]]
                Entered with input  [1, 2, 3]
                        Entered with input  1
                        Leaving with length 0
                        Entered with input  2
                        Leaving with length 0
                        Entered with input  3
                        Leaving with length 0
                Leaving with length 3
                Entered with input  [1]
                        Entered with input  1
                        Leaving with length 0
                Leaving with length 1
        Leaving with length 3
Leaving with length 4
4
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List comprehensions are quite an esoteric property of python and some other languages. It can confuse a lot of people. That said the structure they follow is incredibly simple and based upon set notation:

  1. A variable representing members of an input list in this case the recursive function call.
  2. A list to work upon in this case n
  3. An optional predicate expression.
  4. An output expression that produces entries of the output list based upon entries within the input list that satisfy the predicate.

The function is going to return the largest size list/sublist given an input n. The list comprehension contained in the max function call builds a list of all the sizes of values in the list (0 if it is not a list) using a recursive call of a itself to traverse sub-lists in the same fashion.

To help explain the code you write another function to return the input array passed into the max function call to help improve your understanding:

def b(n):
  return [len(n)]+[b(i) for i in n] if isinstance(n,list) else 0

Example:

>>> x = [1,2,3,4,5,[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],7,[1,2,[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14],4,5,6,[1,2]]]
>>> a(x)
14
>>> b(x)
[8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, [9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], 0, [7, 0, 0, [14, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0], 0, 0, 0, [2, 0, 0]]]

N.B In response to your edit - the + operator allows you to merge two lists together. e.g.:

x = [a,b,c]
y = [d,e,f]
z = x + y;
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Let me break that down for you:

def a(n):
    '''return the largest length of a list or sublists in that list'''
    if isinstance(n, list):
        # if n is a list, return the max of the len of the list
        # for all subitems in the list, perform a(subitem) recursively.
        # so if a sublist is longer than the list, return the largest len.
        return max([len(n)] + [a(i) for i in n]) 
    else:
        # that subitem isn't a list, so return 0, which won't factor into the max calc.
        return 0

I think I would call such a function:

def max_len_list_of_lists(a_list):
    '''return the largest length of a list or sublists in that list'''
    ...
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Assume n is a list with members that can also be lists containing other lists etc, this returns the lenght of the longest list. For instance:

a([2,3,4,5]) = 4   # [2,3,4,5]
a([1, [2,3,4,5], 3]) = 4   # [2,3,4,5]
a([1, [2,3,4,5], [3, [7,8,9,0,1]]]) = 5   # [7,8,9,0,1]

Basically this is a tail recursion saying that the maximum length of all the lists is the maximum among the length of the list passed as input and all its members that are lists.

Run it with a few small examples to see why it holds true.

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