Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a program in Java that requires me to compare the data in 2 files. I have to check each line from file 1 against each line of file 2 and if I find a match write them to a third file. After I read to the end of file 2, how do I reset the pointer to the beginning of the file?

public class FiFo {
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        FileReader file1=new FileReader("d:\\testfiles\\FILE1.txt");
        FileReader file2=new FileReader("d:\\testfiles\\FILE2.txt");
        try{
            String s1,s2;
            while((s1=file1.data.readLine())!=null){
                System.out.println("s1: "+s1);
                while((s2=file2.data.readLine())!=null){
                    System.out.println("s2: "+s2);
                }
            }
            file1.closeFile();
            file2.closeFile();
        }catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

class FileReader {
    BufferedReader data;
    DataInputStream in;

    public FileReader(String fileName)
    {
        try{
            FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream(fileName);
            data = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fstream));
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } 

    public void closeFile()
    {
        try{
            in.close();
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Ok - I did the spelling and the grammar, I'm not doing the formatting. – danben Feb 9 '10 at 4:19
    
I suspect the original poster may be mis-interpreting the assignment and what was actually asked for was a degenerate diff. This guess is based on prior questions by the OP and the comparative difficulty of the solutions. – msw Mar 19 '10 at 20:17

I believe RandomAccessFile is what you need. It contains: RandomAccessFile#seek and RandomAccessFile#getFilePointer.

rewind() is seek(0)

share|improve this answer

I think the best thing to do would be to put each line from file 1 into a HashMap; then you could check each line of file 2 for membership in your HashMap rather than reading through the entire file once for each line of file 1.

But to answer your question of how to go back to the beginning of the file, the easiest thing to do is to open another InputStream/Reader.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - it is much more efficient to load file 1 first. Unless the files can be very large. – Denis Tulskiy Feb 9 '10 at 7:18

Obviously you could just close and reopen the file like this:

     while((s1=file1.data.readLine())!=null){
         System.out.println("s1: "+s1);
         FileReader file2=new FileReader("d:\\testfiles\\FILE2.txt");
         while((s2=file2.data.readLine())!=null){
             System.out.println("s2: "+s2);
             //compare s1 and s2;
         }
         file2.closeFile()
     }

But you really don't want to do it that way, since this algorithm's running time is O(n2). if there were 1000 lines in file A, and 10000 lines in file B, your inner loop would run 1,000,000 times.

What you should do is read each line and store it in a collection that allows quick checks to see if an item is already contained(probably a HashSet).

If you only need to check to see that every line in file 2 is in file 1, then you just add each line in file one to a HashSet, and then check to see that every line in file 2 is in that set.

If you need to do a cross comparison where you find every string that's in one but not the other, then you'll need two hash sets, one for each file. (Although there's a trick you could do to use just one)

If the files are so large that you don't have enough memory, then your original n2 method would never have worked anyway.

share|improve this answer

well, Gennady S. answer is what I would use to solve your problem.

I am writing a program in Java that requires me to compare the data in 2 files

however, I would rather not code this up again.. I would rather use something like http://code.google.com/p/java-diff-utils/

share|improve this answer
1  
That's great to know that there is an open source that tackles these kind of problems, though GPL license type may become a serious issue in using it. – Gennady Shumakher Feb 9 '10 at 5:23
    
@Gennady - only in the land of dinosaurs :-). But seriously, if you are unhappy with the GPL, you are free to develop your own non-GPL libraries. – Stephen C Feb 9 '10 at 6:02
    
@Stephen C, it's not me, it's company's law department :-) But anyhow GPL requires your code to to become GPL which is not appropriate in many cases. – Gennady Shumakher Feb 9 '10 at 6:09
    
@Gennady - and my response remains the same. If GPL is not suitable for you/your company, don't complain about it. Just find a non-GPL alternative or develop one in-house. – Stephen C Feb 9 '10 at 7:00
    
@Stephen C, that wasn't complain. That was the information that important to decide whether the library is usable for the person asking question. – Gennady Shumakher Feb 9 '10 at 7:07

As others have suggested, you should consider other approaches to the problem. For the specific question of returning to a previous point in a file, java.io.FileReader inherits mark() and reset() methods that address this goal.

share|improve this answer

As noted, there are better algorithms - investigate these

aside:

FileReader doesn't implement mark and reset, so trashgod's comments are inaccurate. You'd either have to implement a version of this (using RandomAccessFile or what not) or wrap in a BufferedReader. However, the latter will load the whole thing in memory if you mark it

share|improve this answer

Just a quick Question. can't you keep one object pointed at the start of the file and traverse through the file with another object? Then when you get to the end just point it to the object at the beginning of the file(stream). I believe C++ has such mechanisms with file I/O ( or is it stream I/O)

share|improve this answer

I believe that you could just re-initialize the file 2 file reader and that should reset it.

share|improve this answer

If you can clearly indentify the dimension of your file you can use mark(int readAheadLimit) and reset() from the class BufferedReader. The method mark(int readAhedLimit) add a marker to the current position of your BufferedReader and you can go back to the marker using reset().

Using them you have to be careful to the number of characters to read until the reset(), you have to specify them as the argument of the function mark(int readAhedLimit).

Assuming a limit of 100 characters your code should look like:

class MyFileReader {
    BufferedReader data;
    int maxNumberOfCharacters = 100;

    public MyFileReader(String fileName)
    {
        try{
            FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream(fileName);
            data = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fstream));
            //mark the current position, in this case the beginning of the file
            data.mark(maxNumberOfCharacters);
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void resetFile(){
        data.reset();
    }

    public void closeFile()
    {
        try{
            in.close();
        }
        catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.