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I am getting very weird interpreter behaviour:

>>> _
True
>>> type(True)
<class 'bool'>
>>> type(_)
<class 'bool'>

I tried this because _ came up as a suggestion in Bpython, but it seems to work in the normal interpreter too. I am using

Python 3.3.3 (v3.3.3:c3896275c0f6, Nov 16 2013, 23:39:35) 
[GCC 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5666) (dot 3)] on darwin

Can anybody explain why _ is a substitute for True? Is it legacy, similarly to how ";" can be used to end commands, but is not necessary/encouraged?

EDIT: It seems to be random. This does not happen in a new terminal, but once I start working on something _ starts becoming true. What the hell is going on?

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marked as duplicate by Bakuriu, thefourtheye, Martijn Pieters, devnull, Jon Clements Mar 8 at 13:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
I get NameError: name '_' is not defined. Close the terminal, start afresh, try again. –  thefourtheye Mar 8 at 13:24
1  
    
@thefourtheye That's what I thought too, but it seems to re-appear everytime I get back to work. –  Atsch Mar 8 at 13:28
3  
Note that if you do >>> type(True) and then >>> type(_) you get <type 'type'> as output, and not <type 'bool'>. –  Bakuriu Mar 8 at 13:29
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

_ will be the result of the last evaluated command - at interpreter start up there isn't any so you'll get a NameError... after that, you'll get the previous result... Try opening a new interpreter and doing 2 + 2... you'll see 4 returned, then type _... eg:

>>> _

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#18>", line 1, in <module>
    _
NameError: name '_' is not defined
>>> 2 + 2
4
>>> _
4
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2 + 1
Out[19]: 3

_ + 3
Out[20]: 6

_ stores the last returned value. Try it out.

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_ simply gives you the last result evaluated (in the REPL, not in an ordinary script). This can also mysteriously prevent objects from being deleted immediately.

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_ in the interactive interperter is usually the last output you received.

>>> 1 + 1
2
>>> _
2

Note it only applies to outputs (printed data won't do).

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