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int f(int x)
{
  if (x < 1) return 1;

  return f(x-1) + g(x);
}


int g(int x)
{
  if (x < 2) return 1;

  return f(x-1) + g(x/2)
}

What is big-O of f? More importantly, what technique is used to calculate runtime for problems like this?

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2  
Looks like homework to me ! Do you mind to share any attempt ? –  hivert Mar 8 '14 at 13:44
    
What do you do in your class? –  devnull Mar 8 '14 at 13:44
1  
Smells homework... –  Rontogiannis Aristofanis Mar 8 '14 at 13:47
    
@RontogiannisAristofanis There is nothing wrong with homework questions. –  this Mar 8 '14 at 13:50
    
It was an interview question. If it was homework I wouldn't need to ask here. :) –  Lother Mar 8 '14 at 14:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Lets write Cf(x) (resp Cg(x)) the number of addition performed when calling f(x) (resp g(x)).

First of all both function are returning some number which are obtained by addition going back ultimately to 1. Therefore

Cf(x) = f(x) - 1
Cg(x) = g(x) - 1

So let's stick to f and g. Here are the first few values:

[(f(i), g(i), 2^i) for i in range(10)]
[(1, 1, 1),
 (2, 1, 2),
 (5, 3, 4),
 (11, 6, 8),
 (25, 14, 16),
 (53, 28, 32),
 (112, 59, 64),
 (230, 118, 128),
 (474, 244, 256),
 (962, 488, 512)]

Looks exponential. Moreover:

f(x) = f(x-1) + g(x) 
     = 2*f(x-1) + g(x/2)

This clearly indicate that

f(x) > 2*f(x-1) > 4*f(x-2) > 8*f(x-3) > 2^x. 

So you are good betting that f(x) is a O(2^x), actually a Theta(2^x).

Now f(x) > 2^x and f(x-1) <= g(x) <= f(x). So that g and f grows at the same rate. As a consequence g(x/2) is completely negligible compared to f(x). So that

f(x) is a O(2^n)
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Thank you. I think the key for me here is where you broke out the relationship f(x) > 2*f(x-1) and show how as n approaches the bottom linearly the growth factor is exponential. It has been about 10 years since I've seen any of this in a classroom but I don't remember doing this particular kind of analysis. Of course all of the easy ones come up in interviews (runtime of sort or BFS/DFS, etc..) but this was my first encounter with one like this. Again, thanks for this. –  Lother Mar 8 '14 at 18:38

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