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I have an awk question, let's say I have this:

up2left3right

I want to use awk to change it to this:

up
up
left
left
left
right

Any ideas on how this is possible? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a gnu awk version (due to RS and RT)

echo "up2left3right" | awk  '{for (i=1;i<=(RT?RT:1);i++)  if (NF) print $0}' RS="[0-9]"
up
up
left
left
left
right

It changes the Record Separator to a number.
Then the RT stores the RS used and we uses a loop to repeat the data.


Updated version that now works with number larger than 9 (multiple digits)
Also added \n in RS to work correctly at end of line and if multiple line

awk '{i=RT=="\n"?1:RT;while(i--) if (NF) print $0}' RS="[0-9]+|\n" file

echo -e "up3left12right\ntest4more" | awk '{i=RT=="\n"?1:RT;while(i--) if (NF) print $0}' RS="[0-9]+|\n"
up
up
up
left
left
left
left
left
left
left
left
left
left
left
left
right
test
test
test
test
more
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Honestly I never knew about RT. This is good. – jaypal singh Mar 8 '14 at 15:02
    
@Jotne, +1. nice answer. Today I learned a new variable RT. – sat Mar 8 '14 at 15:04
    
+1 Nice answer. I don't have GNU awk on my OSX Mac. Does this handle "up12left22" and double-digit fields? And do such fiedls occur in the OP's stream? – Mark Setchell Mar 8 '14 at 15:39
1  
@jaypal Another option would be to use perl. It wouldn't suffer from the limitation. – devnull Mar 8 '14 at 16:14
1  
@user2849420 Welcome to StackOverflow. Here you can thank by clicking on the checkmark next to the answer as a token of your appreciation. – jaypal singh Mar 8 '14 at 16:22

Another option would be to use perl:

$ echo up2left3right | perl -pe 's/([A-Za-z]+)(\d+)/"$1\n" x $2/gse;'
up
up
left
left
left
right

Now with counts greater than 10:

$ echo up2down10left2right | perl -pe 's/([A-Za-z]+)(\d+)/"$1\n" x $2/gse;'
up
up
down
down
down
down
down
down
down
down
down
down
left
left
right
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yeah this is much better! No unnecessary loops. – jaypal singh Mar 8 '14 at 16:17
    
@jaypal I was some negative before to people using loops, if other solution was available, but learned from other and by testing, that an awk with loop, may even be faster than an awk with out. So loop does not automatically equal to slow solution. – Jotne Mar 9 '14 at 8:25
    
@Jotne True, I was just saying in context of cleaner code that perl offered. Not often you'll see that happening. ;) – jaypal singh Mar 9 '14 at 8:33
    
+1 for the very good solution. Could you explain the behaviour for us newbies in perl? I can kind of "play" with your solution, but cannot really understand it. – fedorqui Mar 10 '14 at 9:28
1  
@fedorqui x is the multiplication operator. e evaluates the right side as an expression. The idea is to match string and numbers and use the numbers to multiply the string! – devnull Mar 10 '14 at 9:38

Here is possible way with regular awk:

$ echo "up2left3right1wrong2boo" | 
awk '{x=gsub(/[0-9]+/," & ");for(i=1;i<=x*2;i+=2){while($(i+1)--)print $i};if(i)print $i}'
up
up
left
left
left
right
wrong
wrong
boo

We basically create a space before and after a number and loop through each element. Once we encounter a word number pair, we use while loop to continue printing the word until number is exhausted. If word exists stand alone then testing with if loop we print it.

Though it will break where word is missing number and is followed by words with numbers. For following case it will consider rightwrong as one word:

up2left3rightwrong2
share|improve this answer
    
rightwrong this will break any solution. A computer is a computer and does what its told. You can off course add an dictionary and make a cross match to see if you find readable words :) – Jotne Mar 9 '14 at 8:28
    
@Jotne Yeah, dunno why I chose to give that disclaimer. It probably prevented some up-votes for sure! :). – jaypal singh Mar 9 '14 at 8:35
    
Another small thought. I would have looked at what created this stupid input and then fixed that, so every word was on separate line with number to repeat behind. But it was some interesting to solve this, since it was some I not remember to seen here before :) – Jotne Mar 9 '14 at 8:37
    
@Jotne Interesting for sure. Got to know the usefulness and limitations of RT built in – jaypal singh Mar 9 '14 at 8:41
1  
If you have an regex as RS the RT will then contain the actual data used for that. Here is an example. Remove the tags and print the data: echo "<tag>something</tag><tag>more data</tag>" | awk 'RT=="</tag>"' RS='</?tag>' – Jotne Mar 9 '14 at 8:49

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