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Having problems with this.

Let's say I have a parameter composed of a single character and I only want to accept alphabetic characters. How will I determine that the parameter passed is a member of the latin alphabet (az)?

By the way Im using PHP Kohana 3.

Thanks.

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Please clarify the question: what is an alphabets? Maybe you mean an alphabetic character? Or an alphanumeric character? –  wallyk Feb 9 '10 at 5:59
    
Oh, ok I stand to be corrected. Alphabetic should be the proper term. Thanks. –  Ed. Feb 9 '10 at 6:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use the following guard clause at the top of your method:

if (!preg_match("/^[a-z]$/", $param)) {
    // throw an Exception...
}

If you want to allow upper case letters too, change the regular expression accordingly:

if (!preg_match("/^[a-zA-Z]$/", $param)) {
    // throw an Exception...
}

Another way to support case insensitivity is to use the /i case insensitivity modifier:

if (!preg_match("/^[a-z]$/i", $param)) {
    // throw an Exception...
}
share|improve this answer
    
preg_match("/^[a-z]$/i", $param) or use case insensitive –  Xorlev Feb 9 '10 at 6:05
    
Your comments are backwards. If preg_match succeeds in matching [a-z], then you should not throw an exception. if(!preg_match(...)) { exception! } –  Nick Presta Feb 9 '10 at 6:32
    
@Nick Presta: Good catch. I added a ! to the conditions. Thanks :) –  Asaph Feb 9 '10 at 6:34
2  
Regex are fine, but many times you use one, even if trivial, you reinvent the wheel and introduce contact surface for bugs. I'd prefer php.net/manual/en/book.ctype.php . –  phresnel Feb 9 '10 at 8:43
1  
Um, that’s almost always wrong. you want /^\p{Alphabetic}+$/ instead. –  tchrist Feb 10 '11 at 15:24

You can try:

preg_match('/^[a-zA-Z]$/',$input_char);

The return value of the above function is true if the $input_char contains a single alphabet, else it is false. You can suitably make use of return value.

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preg_match('/^[a-zA-Z]$/', $var_vhar);

Method will return int value: for no match returns 0 and for matches returns 1.

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1  
Regex are fine, but many times you use one, even if trivial, you reinvent the wheel and introduce contact surface for bugs. I'd prefer php.net/manual/en/book.ctype.php –  phresnel Feb 9 '10 at 8:44
    
A-Z is passé. –  tchrist Feb 10 '11 at 15:25

http://php.net/manual/en/function.ctype-alpha.php

<?php
    $ch = 'a';
    if (ctype_alpha($ch)) {
        // Accept
    } else {
        // Reject
    }

This also takes locale into account if you set it correctly.

EDIT: To be complete, other posters here seem to think that you need to ensure the parameter is a single character, or else the parameter is invalid. To check the length of a string, you can use strlen(). If strlen() returns any non-1 number, then you can reject the parameter, too.

As it stands, your question at the time of answering, conveys that you have a single character parameter somewhere and you want to check that it is alphabetical. I have provided a general purpose solution that does this, and is locale friendly too.

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But what if $ch is more than one character long? –  Asaph Feb 9 '10 at 6:17
1  
From the manual: Checks if all of the characters in the provided string, text , are alphabetic ctype_alpha() accepts a string. –  Nick Presta Feb 9 '10 at 6:24
    
I know what ctype_alpha() does. The OP wants to reject all input that is more than one character long and your solution doesn't do that. –  Asaph Feb 9 '10 at 6:27
1  
The OP says that he has a single character and wants to check that it is alphabetical. He does not mention that he needs to restrict this to a single character. His parameter is already a single character, as far as I can tell. –  Nick Presta Feb 9 '10 at 6:29
2  
I had a different interpretation. I suppose the requirements need to be clarified. Let's talk about it with the OP in tomorrow morning's scrum. :) –  Asaph Feb 9 '10 at 6:32

I'd use ctype, as Nick suggested,since it is not only faster than regex, it is even faster than most of the string functions built into PHP. But you also need to make sure it is a single character:

if (ctype_alpha($ch) && strlen($ch) == 1) {
    // Accept
} else {
    // Reject
}
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No you don't. ctype_alpha checks the whole string. See the manual. –  Nick Presta Feb 9 '10 at 6:25
1  
I know it does. But he only wants the parameter to be a single character. So if the string is AB it should be rejected, regardless of if they both are checked with ctype_alpha. See the question. –  Anthony Feb 9 '10 at 6:44
    
Perhaps you should see the question. The OP states he already has a single character parameter. He wants to check if that parameter is alphabetical. Checking the length of the parameter is the responsibility of the caller, or at least shouldn't be handled here as the OP never asked for this, and has nothing to do with the question, "Determining if a character is alphabetic". –  Nick Presta Feb 9 '10 at 6:57

You can't use [a-zA-Z] for Unicode.

here are the example working with Unicode,

if ( preg_match('/^\p{L}+$/u', 'my text') ) {
    echo 'match';
} else {
    echo 'not match';
}
share|improve this answer

This will help hopefully.This a simple function in php called ctype_alpha

$mystring = 'a'
if (ctype_alpha($mystring))
{
    //Then do the code here.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just for future reference; there were already two answers here that gave information about using ctype_alpha, each posted more than 4 years ago. These answers also included more explanation, and integrated the sample into what the OP's code was doing. In general, you should only add an answer to a very old question like this if you have something substantive to add. –  Andrew Barber Nov 3 at 17:44

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