Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I keep seeing this snippet everywhere, and it works! why?

while gets
    print if /start/../end/
end

How does ruby evaluate /start/ without an Lvalue? I would expect that we would first have to store the value of 'gets' somewhere and then do

gets_result =~ /start/.. gets_result =~ /end/

So why does the snippet work?

Let me clear this up.

How does ruby know to compare the regular expression against gets In the snippet above at no point do I specify to ruby that the reg exp is to be compared to gets but it just knows. Question is how?

share|improve this question
1  
what do you mean by works? –  Arup Rakshit Mar 8 '14 at 15:02
1  
The code does not work. A regex cannot be a part of a range. –  sawa Mar 8 '14 at 15:03
1  
It's not a range, it's a flip-flop operator. –  Zach Kemp Mar 8 '14 at 15:04
    
guys please just copy the snippet into your interpreter, rather than telling me how it doesn't work. Thankyou. –  code shogan Mar 8 '14 at 15:05
1  
this is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1111286/… –  Arup Rakshit Mar 8 '14 at 15:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Kernel#gets not only returns the next line, but also assign the value to $_.

Kernel#print print $_ if there's no argument.

The flip-flop operator (/start/../end/) also operate on $_.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you tell me how $_ is related to this question. asked out of curiosity. –  Arup Rakshit Mar 8 '14 at 15:45
    
@ArupRakshit, Are you asking for this? github.com/ruby/ruby/blob/… –  falsetru Mar 8 '14 at 16:17

Nice question.

Remember: When the Range operator (.. or ...) is used in a conditional statement, it does something totally unexpected: it doesn't create a Range object. Instead, it acts as a "flip-flop" operator.

The below code actually

while gets
    print if /start/../end/
end

by default is

while gets
    # gets_input I put just to make the code more expressive
    # actually the input taken using gets method applied here implicitly.
    print if  /start/ =~ gets_input .. /end/ =~ gets_input
end

Let me proof you. I took the help of Ruby Tracer class.

trace = TracePoint.new do |tp|
  p [tp.lineno, tp.event, tp.defined_class,tp.method_id]
end
trace.enable do
  while gets
    # when you type start in your console, 11 will be output.
    print 11 if /start/../end/
  end
end

Let me run this code, to show you my above code as a proof and also the Ruby Flip-Flop feature :

(arup~>Ruby)$ ruby test.rb
test.rb:6: warning: regex literal in condition
test.rb:6: warning: regex literal in condition
[4, :b_call, nil, nil]
[5, :line, nil, nil]
[5, :c_call, Kernel, :gets]
[5, :c_call, ARGF.class, :gets]
end # I presses **end** here.
[5, :c_return, ARGF.class, :gets]
[5, :c_return, Kernel, :gets]
[6, :line, nil, nil]
# Regexp#=~ call begin happened for /end/ =~ gets_input
[6, :c_call, Regexp, :=~]
# Regexp#=~ call end happened for /end/ =~ gets_input
[6, :c_return, Regexp, :=~] 
[5, :c_call, Kernel, :gets]
[5, :c_call, ARGF.class, :gets]
start # I presses **start** here.
[5, :c_return, ARGF.class, :gets]
[5, :c_return, Kernel, :gets]
[6, :line, nil, nil]
# Regexp#=~ call begin happened for /start/ =~ gets_input
[6, :c_call, Regexp, :=~] 
# Regexp#=~ call end happened for /start/ =~ gets_input
[6, :c_return, Regexp, :=~]
# Regexp#=~ call begin happened for /end/ =~ gets_input
[6, :c_call, Regexp, :=~] 
# Regexp#=~ call end happened for /end/ =~ gets_input
[6, :c_return, Regexp, :=~] 
[6, :c_call, Kernel, :print]
[6, :c_call, IO, :write]
[6, :c_call, Fixnum, :to_s]
[6, :c_return, Fixnum, :to_s]
# As there is a match so **if** clause true, thus 11 printed
11[6, :c_return, IO, :write] 
[6, :c_return, Kernel, :print]
[5, :c_call, Kernel, :gets]
[5, :c_call, ARGF.class, :gets]
end  
[5, :c_return, ARGF.class, :gets]
[5, :c_return, Kernel, :gets]
[6, :line, nil, nil]
[6, :c_call, Regexp, :=~]
[6, :c_return, Regexp, :=~]
[6, :c_call, Kernel, :print]
[6, :c_call, IO, :write]
[6, :c_call, Fixnum, :to_s]
[6, :c_return, Fixnum, :to_s]
11[6, :c_return, IO, :write]
[6, :c_return, Kernel, :print]
[5, :c_call, Kernel, :gets]
[5, :c_call, ARGF.class, :gets]
share|improve this answer

In this case, .. is a flip-flop operator. When given 'start', the condition evaluates to true, and continues being true until end is given.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.