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I am trying to make a demo cryptocurrency based on litecoin but before even starting to do this, I am currently unable to compile litecoin (unaltered) source code into litecoind.

First I installed the dependencies using Macports:

sudo port install boost db48 qt4-mac openssl miniupnpc git

Cloned from github. (https://github.com/litecoin-project/litecoin.git) In terminal navigated to the src folder and ran:

make -f makefile.osx USE_UPNP=-

It starts compiling and then gives me the following error:

ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64 clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation) make: * [litecoind] Error 1

I have xcode and have a bit of programming knowledge, but please try and explain in simple terms how to fix this.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to compile source that uses 32-bit specific system calls as 64-bit application? – Petr 'lapk' Budnik Mar 8 '14 at 20:40
    
Sorry, I don't really understand. I copied the source from github (I don't know if it's designed to be 32bit or 64bit) for my 64bit (I believe) 10.9.1 macbook pro. – user3148788 Mar 8 '14 at 20:56
    
ld is a linker. It seems, it cannot find 64-bit variant of some dependencies. Try reading their docs. They talk about rebuilding dependencies on MacOS x64 here github.com/litecoin-project/litecoin/commit/… – Petr 'lapk' Budnik Mar 8 '14 at 21:12
    
I don't think you linked to the right thing. Thanks anyway, but I can't find anything about 64-bit dependencies, it just seems to be a list of changes from bitcoin to litecoin. – user3148788 Mar 8 '14 at 21:18
    
Sorry, found it! Thanks. – user3148788 Mar 8 '14 at 21:19

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