Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm learning awk and I have trouble passing a variable to the script AND using it as part of a regex search pattern.

The example is contrived but shows my probem.

My data is the following:

Eddy        Smith       0600000000  1981-07-16    Los Angeles
Frank       Smith       0611111111  1947-04-29    Chicago           
Victoria    McSmith     0687654321  1982-12-16    Los Angeles
Barbara     Smithy      0633244321  1984-06-24    Boston            
Jane        McSmithy    0612345678  1947-01-15    Chicago               
Grace       Jones       0622222222  1985-10-07    Los Angeles
Bernard     Jones       0647658763  1988-01-01    New York          
George      Jonesy      0623428948  1983-01-01    New York          
Indiana     McJones     0698732298  1952-01-01    Miami             
Philip      McJonesy    0644238523  1954-01-01    Miami

I want an awk script that I can pass a variable and then have the awk script do a regex for the variable. I've got this script now called "003_search_persons.awk".

#this awk script looks for a certain name, returns firstName, lastName and City

#print column headers
BEGIN {
    printf "firstName lastName City\n";
}

#look for the name, print firstName, lastName and City
$2 ~ name {
    printf $1 " " $2 " " $5 " " $6;
    printf "\n";
}

I call the script like this:

awk -f 003_search_persons.awk name=Smith 003_persons.txt

It returns the following, which is good.

firstName lastName City
Eddy Smith Los Angeles
Frank Smith Chicago
Victoria McSmith Los Angeles
Barbara Smithy Boston
Jane McSmithy Chicago

But now I want to look for a certain prefix "Mc". I could ofcourse hardcode this, but I want an awk script that is flexible. I wrote the following in 003_search_persons_prefix.awk.

#this awk script looks for a certain prefix to a name, returns firstName, lastName and City

#print column headers
BEGIN {
    printf "firstName lastName City\n";
}

#look for the prefix, print firstName, lastName and City
/^prefix/{
    printf $1 " " $2 " " $5 " " $6;
    printf "\n";
}

I call the script like this:

awk -f 003_search_persons_prefix.awk prefix=Mc 003_persons.txt

But now it finds no records.

The problem is the search pattern "/^prefix/". I know I can replace that search pattern by a non-regex one, as in the first script, but suppose I want to do it with a regex, because I need the prefix to really be at the start of the lastName field, as it should be, being a prefix and all ;-)

How do I do this?

share|improve this question
2  
cleanup in aisle 5: get rid of all the null statements (trailing semi-colons), change printf "\n" to simply print "", and change printf $1 " " $2 etc. to simply print $1, $2 etc. –  Ed Morton Nov 13 '12 at 18:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

you can try this

BEGIN{
 printf "firstName lastName City\n";
 split(ARGV[1], n,"=")
 prefix=n[2]
 pat="^"prefix
}
$0 ~ pat{
    print "found: "$0
}

output

$ awk -f  test.awk name=Jane file
firstName lastName City
found: Jane        McSmithy    0612345678  1947-01-15    Chicago

Look at the awk documentation for more. (and read it from start to finish!)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll test this shortly. –  Niels Bom Feb 9 '10 at 9:52
4  
None of that splitting stuff is necessary because using name=Jane in the arg list creates a variable named "name" with the value "Jane" so you could have just said pat="^"name in an FNR==1 section. Setting variables with "-v" is preferable anyway though so you don't have to work around variables not being populated in the BEGIN section. –  Ed Morton Nov 13 '12 at 18:22

is awk specifically required? I'm sure it's quite possible in awk, but i don't know it, if you just need to get the job done then you can try. not sure exactly what that delimiter is though.

cut -d " " -f1-2,5 file | egrep '^regex'
share|improve this answer
    
awk is a power tool that does the job of cut and grep combined. so yes its possible with awk. See gnu.org/manual/gawk/html_node/… –  ghostdog74 Feb 9 '10 at 8:22
    
I'm interested in the awk solution for this. But thanks. –  Niels Bom Feb 9 '10 at 9:50

You should be able to use your original script unchanged - $2 ~ name is already doing a regex search so if you call your script with name=^Mc then it will return names starting with "Mc". Actually this is not a good example, since Mc only appears at the start of the name - if you use name=^Smith then it will find the Smiths but not the McSmiths.

share|improve this answer
    
But then I would have to pass a regex (^Smith) as the parameter, and personally I think that's a little ugly. –  Niels Bom Feb 9 '10 at 9:57

Change your script to:

BEGIN {
    print "firstName", "lastName", "City"
    ORS = "\n\n"
}

$0 ~ "^" prefix {
    print $1, $2, $5, $6
}

and call it as

awk -v prefix="Mc" -f 003_search_persons.awk 003_persons.txt
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.