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Some background:

  • I'm a long-time reader but a first-time poster. I have modest experience in Java but very little in C.
  • I've created a doubly linked list, where the data in each node is actually a "player" struct.
  • I've successfully populated the structs for each node in the list.
  • I've done extensive testing on the list itself and it's behaving as expected.
  • I want each node in the linked list to have a void pointer, since I plan on using this code for several different types of lists that eventually interact with one another.
  • My approach has been to initially store values read from a file in an array, and then read those data into each node's data element. This seems to have been successful.

My problem: When I try to ACCESS the values of the individual elements in the "player" struct, I get nonsense. I'm almost sure this is a pointer issue, as that's been my biggest weakness with C thus far. Pertinent code:

I'm showing the structs just in case I wasn't clear. Note the void pointer in Node, which eventually points to a Player struct:

struct Node;
typedef struct Node {
    void *data;
    struct Node *prev;
    struct Node *next;
} Node;

typedef struct Player {
    char *name;
    char *pos;
    double *num;
} Player ;

I'm including the code I've written where I add the data from the array to the list and print the results. I also show resulting console output.

// char *vals[linesInFile][3] has already been declared.
// List playerList has already been created and initialized; it currently has 0 nodes.
// int i represents the number of nodes in the list.
// getNode and addNode do just what you'd expect them to do.  Both functions have been thoroughly tested.`

Player *player = calloc(1, sizeof(Player));
int n;
for(n = 0; n < i; n++) {
    if(vals[n][0] != NULL) {
        addNode(playerList, n, NULL);
        getNode(playerList, n)->data = &player;
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->name = vals[n][0];
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->pos = vals[n][1];
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->num = vals[n][2];
        printf("%d: %s\n", n, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->name);
        printf("%d: %s\n", n, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->pos);
        printf("%d: %s\n", n, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->num);
        printf("\n");
    }
}

0: Mike Trout
0: CF
0: 4276

1: Bryce Harper
1: LF
1: 4599

2: Jose Fernandez
2: SP
2: 5023

Everything works fine so far. Finally, I'm including the code snippet I've written that attempts to find the values of the player struct from the main function.

// The getSize method has been tested and correctly returns the size of a list.
int i;
for(i = 0; i < getSize(playerList); i++) {
    printf("%d: %s\n", i, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, i)->data)->name);
    // The output from this is garbage.
    char *playerName = ((Player *)getNode(playerList, i)->data)->name;
    printf("%d: %s\n", i, playerName);
    // The output from this is garbage.
}

I'm not positive that all of the code prior this last block is correct, but at very least it seems to be producing desired output. Hopefully this is just an easy pointer problem with the last block of code. Regardless, any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Aren't all the calls to getNode going to return the node that points at the player? Why keep calling getNode and casting the data instead of just accessing player? –  pat Mar 8 '14 at 23:25
    
I feel pretty stupid even asking, but how would one go about directly accessing player? –  jda Mar 8 '14 at 23:42
    
player->name = vals[n][0]; –  pat Mar 9 '14 at 0:54
    
The num field is a pointer to a double, but you are treating it like a char* –  pat Mar 9 '14 at 0:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This line seems to be wrong:

getNode(playerList, n)->data = &player;

player is already a pointer to a Player, thus, this line is actually setting the new node's data field to a pointer to pointer to Player, and the rest of your code uses it as if it were a pointer to Player - type mismatch, that's your problem.

Instead, that line should be:

getNode(playerList, n)->data = player;

That is, you do not need to apply the address of operator. The rest of the code looks ok.

The code seems to be fine because your printing statements are misleading. You only allocate one node, and keep changing its value over and over. The thing is, for each time you change the fields on that node, you print it, so the output looks correct, but the program is only ever storing one node with one piece of information at a time. You store, print it, overwrite, print, overwrite, print....

To fix this, you need to explicitly allocate a new node on each iteration:

Player *player;
int n;
for(n = 0; n < i; n++) {
    if(vals[n][0] != NULL) {
        player = calloc(1, sizeof(Player));
        addNode(playerList, n, NULL);
        getNode(playerList, n)->data = player;
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->name = vals[n][0];
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->pos = vals[n][1];
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->num = vals[n][2];
    }
}

And then, after populating the list, print it:

for(n = 0; n < i; n++) {
    if(vals[n][0] != NULL) {
        printf("%d: %s\n", n, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->name);
        printf("%d: %s\n", n, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->pos);
        printf("%d: %s\n", n, ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->num);
        printf("\n");
    }
}

Also, if you don't want to copy the pointers from the array but duplicate its contents, you can use strdup():

        /* ... */
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->name = strdup(vals[n][0]);
        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->pos = strdup(vals[n][1]);

However, remember that you must now free() each one of name and pos before freeing the node itself. Also, since num is a pointer to double, you can't use strdup on it. Instead, you must manually allocate memory and copy its contents:

        ((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->num = malloc(sizeof(double));
        *((Player *)getNode(playerList, n)->data)->num = *vals[n][2];
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I fixed this, but the problem described in the original post is still there. Note that even with my "pointer to a pointer" issue, I was still getting the correct output as listed after that section of the code. Still, thank you for pointing out that flaw in the code. –  jda Mar 8 '14 at 23:33
    
@jda See the other answer. Especially the part that says you are only copying the pointers. –  Filipe Gonçalves Mar 8 '14 at 23:36
    
@jda see updated answer. –  Filipe Gonçalves Mar 8 '14 at 23:45
    
That did it! Thank you so much for the resolution, and thank you to everyone else who took the time to help as well. –  jda Mar 8 '14 at 23:55
    
Note that strdup is not a (C-)standard function and may not be available on your platform. –  Kninnug Mar 9 '14 at 0:05

As well as the & issue that Filipe Gonçalves pointed out, you have a couple of other issues.

You only allocate one Player struct and then use it for every item in the list. This will mean they all point to the same data and you will end up printing the last player details i times. You should move the calloc to inside the for n loop.

You are also only copying the pointers for the name, pos, and num values out of vals. This may be fine, but it does mean that vals needs to stay in scope (or not be deallocated) for the lifetime of the player list.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, I rushed through the code and didn't notice the one time allocate. Good answer. –  Filipe Gonçalves Mar 8 '14 at 23:36
    
Thank you both! I'm wondering why, in spite of the one-time allocate, I'm still getting correct output when initially printing right after setting up a given node's player struct. Regardless, I think The Dark's latter point may be the Big Problem here - if I'm just pointing back to "vals" (which is defined inside a separate file from the one containing my main function), could that cause the undefined behavior? –  jda Mar 8 '14 at 23:39
    
@jda It's a problem if it goes out of scope before the player list. –  Filipe Gonçalves Mar 8 '14 at 23:40
    
Thank you again! Would you guys be able to give a few hints re: implementing a solution? Specifically, is there a better approach than copying pointers for name, pos and num values out of the "vals" multidimensional array? –  jda Mar 8 '14 at 23:44
    
For the name, you could allocate space and copy the string contents. strdup will do that for you. You then have to remember to free the allocated space when you free your Player structure. Alternatively, if you know the largest size of the name, you could have name as a char array, e.g char name[20]. You would then need to ensure that you don't overflow the limit. strncpy would help here. For pos and num, do they need to be pointers at all? They could just be the actual values, if they are numeric (although the data looks like they are strings too). –  The Dark Mar 9 '14 at 0:04

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