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I am publishing a npm package developed with Browserify, and wonder what is the proper manner to construct a package.json.

The package is a node server-client app (it is actually atom package), and the client side is based on Browseriy.

./www/js/index.js -> ./www/js/index.bundled.js

The required modules are marked and highlight.js.

The both modules are used only on the client side code/file which is bundled by blowserfiy.

A lazy and simple solution would be simply, just to have

package.json A

{
  ......,
  "dependencies":
  {
    ...,
    ...,
    "highlight.js": "*",
    "marked": "*"
  }
}

and to include the www/js/index.bundled.js file in the npm package files as it is after the browserify in my local dev environment.

However, now I think the npm package.json can be one of the below:

package.json B

{
  ......,
  "dependencies":
  {
    ...,
    ...,
  },
  "devDependencies":
  {
    "highlight.js": "*",
    "marked": "*",
    "browserify": "*"
  }
}

In this case, browserified ./www/js/index.bundled.js file is left in the npm package, and treat marked and highlight.js as a devDependencies, and also browserify.

Then

package.json C

{
  ......,
  "dependencies":
  {
    ...,
    ...,
    "highlight.js": "*",
    "marked": "*",
    "browserify": "*"
  },
  "scripts": {
    "run": "browserify ./www/js/index.js -o ./www/js/index.bundled.js"
  }
}

Just let you know, I have never tried this, and don't know this scripts-run actually runs on npm install myPackage, perhaps not, and maybe you know the proper configuration, maybe there's no such a thing.

In this scenario, ./www/js/index.bundled.js is excluded from the npm package file, and built from the latest npm packaged marked and highlight.js.

The reason I think this manner is somewhat proper is especially in the scenario the npm modules are used and shared in both server and client side.

For instance, take a look at dnode. This RPC module is developed by the same author of browserify (@substack), and should share the same version of dnode module in both server and client side. If a pre browserified ./www/js/index.bundled.js is bundled in the published npm package, it will be outdated compared to server side dnode. Sure we may be able to specify the version to install by package.json, but it's better to use the latest on both server and client side.

Any suggestion? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

I suggest to use second choice and specify browserify as a devDependency.

You have to build it before you publish your package to npm registry, so users won't need to install browserify themselves.

It's also useful to add a Makefile and make as a prepublish script.

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Thanks. I think this works when the modules are only used in the client side, and I wonder if some modules are shared between client and server side. Perhaps, in that case, we need to specify the version of the modules to sync. –  Ken OKABE Mar 9 at 21:21

I tried a stuff, and answer by myself.

"dependencies":
  {
    ......
    "highlight.js": "*",
    "marked": "*",
    "browserify": "*"
  },
  "scripts":
  {
    "install": "browserify ./lib/www/js/index.js -o ./lib/www/js/index.bundle.js"
  }

It has been so unclear "devDependencies" is installed with npm install without any flag, but turns out that is is not installed, so I had to add whole package including brwoserify, and run scirpts - install as it's written.

I know https://www.npmjs.org/doc/misc/npm-scripts.html page does not recommended scripts-install, but reading the docs, I don't see what is wrong to do so in my case.

In this way, we can include the most update and client-server synced browserified bundled file on each install that I think important.

The big draw back is obviously the package size goes big because browserify is big. 54Mbytes within 55Mbytes of the package is taken by browserify, but I don't know if I should also add a command to remove it after the installation.

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2  
No no no, this is not how it's done. Your library or whatever should 'depend' on browserify solely in development environment. That's why it should always be listed as a dev dependency. And the page on npm-scripts is basically hinting this. You should run browserify on your dev machine before you publish the package, and that's why it is a good fit for prepublish script, not the install :) Anyhow, keep coding buddy ;) –  iccthedral May 17 at 12:12
    
Thanks iccthederal, I'm a bit remote from the project, but when come back, I definitely need to investigate what you suggested. –  Ken OKABE May 17 at 22:13

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