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I'm trying to learn C but am having difficulties with getting my program to recognize the scanf() function. I've included my code below and I'm sure it's some silly mistake - any guidance is very appreciated :)

int i = 0;
int boolean = 1;
while (boolean) {
    printf("Options\n1.Save\n2.Load\n3.Edit\n4.Quit\n");
    scanf("%d", &i);
    if (i==4) {
        boolean--;
        break;
    }
    else if(i <= 3 && i >=1) {
        /*will edit later - irrelevant*/
    }
    else {
        printf("Please enter a valid number");
    }
}

When I run the program the user isn't even prompted for a number - instead I get stuck in an infinite loop because boolean is never false. Why won't the program stop and take input from the user?

EDIT

I see now that it's more than relevant to mention that the twist with this code is that earlier on I'm redirecting STDIN from a text file (which I've just named filename ~ Thus from the command line when I run my program I'll type: ./myProgram < filename) Is this the reason my program won't ask the user for more input as instead it goes to filename? I thought it would just read from the filename and then allow me to switch back to asking the user for numbers.

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3  
No problem is there. It is running fine. –  Shashwat Kumar Mar 9 at 20:10
3  
If you type a non-numeric character (letter, punctuation other than + or -) as the first character, your scanf() is hosed. It will repeatedly return 0, which goes to the 'will edit later' part, and then goes back to prompt, but runs into the same problem again, and this keeps going for a while... The fix is to always check the input function directly: if (scanf("%d", &i) != 1) { break; }, for example. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 at 20:11
1  
i don't see any mistake in program itself, except that no <stdio.h> included, but i'm sure you did it up there, just not in this section. does the menu get printed or even printed repeatedly in your while loop? –  miushock Mar 9 at 20:12
1  
There's a non-numeric character stuck in the input buffer, then, and part of the fix is the test of scanf() as in my previous comment. You can print a diagnostic message before the break (but inside the { … }). The non-numeric character must be left over from some previous input, so you've got a string that's too long or multiple words on a line of input but you used %s to read just the first word, or … One powerful diagnostic is to echo inputs immediately after you've got them. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 at 20:14
2  
Post Edit: your code does not detect EOF, so yes, it is relevant that you redirected from a file. You must test that scanf() gets exactly the result you expect and break the loop if it doesn't. That's the if (scanf("%d", &i) != 1) { …report…; break; } I've suggested. ALWAYS check the result of scanf() — but you have to do it properly, as shown. Checking against EOF is not correct; you can get 0 back instead of EOF. Test for the expected number of conversions. By all means capture the return value and use that: if ((rc = scanf("%d", &i)) != 1) { printf("Got rc = %d\n", rc); … –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 at 20:25

2 Answers 2

It works on my XCode 5, Mac OSX Mavericks machine. if this is on main function, make sure you have return 0; line at the end of the function.

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If you ignore the return status from scanf(), your code will appear to ignore scanf().

As noted extensively in the comments, your code should look more like:

int i = 0;
int boolean = 1;
while (boolean) {
    int rc;
    printf("Options\n1.Save\n2.Load\n3.Edit\n4.Quit\n");
    if ((rc = scanf("%d", &i)) != 1)
    {
        int c;
        printf("DEBUG: scanf failed: rc = %d\n", rc);
        while ((c = getchar()) != EOF && c != '\n')
            printf("DEBUG: next character: %d (%c)\n", c, c);
        break;
    }
    if (i==4) {
        boolean--;
        break;
    }
    else if (i <= 3 && i >=1) {
        printf("DEBUG: i = %d\n", i);
        /*will edit later - irrelevant*/
    }
    else {
        printf("Please enter a valid number!\n");
    }
}

Note the debugging print in the section that is otherwise executed.

I've also added debugging printing to report on the characters left on the input line after scanf() fails. Note that the preferred solution for such issues, using fgets() or getline() to read the line and sscanf() to parse the line makes error reporting much simpler; you've got the whole line to report, not what's left after scanf() has mangled it.

This can be streamlined to avoid the variable called boolean:

int i = 0;
while (i != 4) {
    int rc;
    printf("Options\n1.Save\n2.Load\n3.Edit\n4.Quit\n");
    if ((rc = scanf("%d", &i)) != 1)
    {
        printf("scanf failed: rc = %d\n", rc);
        break;
    }
    if (i==4) {
        printf("read %d - quit\n", i);
        break;
    }
    else if (i <= 3 && i >=1) {
        printf("DEBUG: i = %d\n", i);
        /*will edit later - irrelevant*/
    }
    else {
        printf("Please enter a valid number!\n");
    }
}

The key point is testing the return value from scanf().


xscan.c

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i = 0;
    while (i != 4)
    {
        int rc;
        printf("Options\n1.Save\n2.Load\n3.Edit\n4.Quit\n");
        if ((rc = scanf("%d", &i)) != 1)
        {
            int c;
            printf("DEBUG: scanf failed: rc = %d\n", rc);
            while ((c = getchar()) != EOF && c != '\n')
                printf("DEBUG: next character: %d (%c)\n", c, c);
            break;
        }
        else if (i == 4)
        {
            printf("Got %d - quitting\n", i);
            break;
        }
        else if (i <= 3 && i >= 1)
            printf("DEBUG: i = %d\n", i);
        else
            printf("Please enter a valid number! (got %d)\n", i);
    }
    printf("After loop\n");
    return 0;
}

Compilation

gcc -O3 -g -std=c11 -Wall -Wextra -Werror xscan.c -o xscan  

Example 1

$ xscan < xdata.1
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
DEBUG: i = 1
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
DEBUG: i = 2
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
DEBUG: i = 3
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
DEBUG: scanf failed: rc = 0
DEBUG: next character: 120 (x)
After loop
$

Example 2

$ xscan < xdata.2
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
Please enter a valid number! (got 0)
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
Please enter a valid number! (got 5)
Options
1.Save
2.Load
3.Edit
4.Quit
Got 4 - quitting
After loop
$

xdata.1

1
2
3
x

xdata.2

0
5
4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jonathan for helping clear this up. Everyone's logic makes sense, but when I use the code you gave me it still doesn't want to accept any input. Guess I have a particularly stubborn program... –  Jerler Mar 9 at 20:52
    
You'll need to show your code more nearly completely, and the data file you're redirecting as standard input. While I've not formally compiled the code I posted, I'd be rather surprised if it didn't work as I expected it to. See also my update diagnosing what's left on the line you're trying to read. For debugging, you almost can't have too much information. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 at 21:30
    
OK: now I've formally compiled the code I posted, and I've updated my answer with a complete program that demonstrates the code working correctly with some input files, each of which includes both bogus and valid data. (I've also run xscan <<< "1 2 3" and that behaves correctly too.) Any further problems are because your code doesn't match mine in some significant way. Testing with GCC 4.8.2 on Mac OS X 10.9.2. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 9 at 21:43
    
Holy cow - thanks so much for your help! I'll test it out, but if nothing else it already looks pretty impressive. Thanks! –  Jerler Mar 10 at 2:30

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