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Have a thread which produces random integers, and puts them into a list. Have also two threads which uses items up from the list concurrently. These threads need to sum up the items which they grab out of the list. Pause these threads until the list is filled. Then print out the summed results of the two threads.

I think, wait() and notify() should be used here. However, I'm not sure I properly understand how this works.

This thread grabs items from the list

@Override
public void run() {
  try
  {
    while (list.size() > 0) {
      synchronized (list) {
        list.wait();
        result += (Integer) list.remove(0);
      }
    }

  } catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
  }
}

This is what fills the list.

@Override
public void run() {
  try {
    synchronized (list) {
      list.wait();
      for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        list.add(random.nextInt());
        System.out.println("fill");
      }
      list.notify();
    }
  } catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
  }
}

However, they never finish.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry the question isn't clear. Please provide an example with timeline of what should happen – gerrytan Mar 9 '14 at 22:19
    
@gerrytan This was actually a (very confusing) course task. I think I misunderstood it for first as well. See my answer. – kdani Mar 9 '14 at 22:57
    
You only notify() once, you you wait() on every integer. This almost certainly will block after the first Integer but possibly right from the start if the notify() is triggered before the thread starts. – Peter Lawrey Mar 9 '14 at 23:06

Your code has a number of problem:

  • You claim to have two threads that read from the list, but you only show one.
  • You're accessing the list before locking it in the first code block. You need to put the synchronized(list) statement around the while loop.
  • The code that fills the list waits w/o having anything to notify it.
  • If your grab-items-from-the-list thread runs first, the list will be empty so it won't do anything. That's probably not what you want.

There is evidence of enough confusion here that I'd suggest trying to think this through in a more abstract way before jumping into writing code.

share|improve this answer

Well I think I too misunderstood the problem. Here is the correct solution.

This fills the list.

@Override
public void run() {
    synchronized(list) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            list.add(random.nextInt());
        }
        list.notify();
    }
}

This sums the items.

@Override
public void run() {
    synchronized(list) {
        while (list.size() > 0) {
            result += (Integer) list.remove(0);
        }
        list.notify();
    }
}

So they just have to lock the list itself, basically.

This, prints out the final solution:

    try {
        sum1.join();
        sum2.join();
        System.out.println(sum1.getResult() + sum2.getResult());
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

Anyway, I don't think concurrency implemented like this does not have any practical use - this was just a course task.

share|improve this answer
    
If you aren't allowed to use higher level concurrency libaries then this is your only option. Or if you were building higher level concurrency data structures and algorithms then you have to use these primitives to do so. So they most certainly have practical use. – chubbsondubs Mar 9 '14 at 23:00
    
Yes, I'm not allowed to use high level libraries. And I understand why is it practical, in the way you mean. But it depends on the algorithm and the data structure. I mean if I understand concurrency correctly, then in this example, thread management costs much-much more, than actual operations with the list. Of course if the actual operations were slower, it would be better, I think. Your answer is informative, by the way! – kdani Mar 9 '14 at 23:11

The notify() call in the filler thread only notifies one of the waiting threads. Only one thread proceeds to pull one integer. Then it waits again. With nothing firing a notify it waits forever. It needs to only wait if nothing is in the list.

Instead of reinventing the wheel use a BlockingQueue like so:

public Runnable createSum( final BlockingQueue<Integer> queue, final BlockingQueue<Integer> output ) {
   return new Runnable() {
      public void run() {
          Integer result = 0;
          while( !queue.isEmpty() ) {
              result += queue.take();
          }
          output.put( result );
      }
   }
}

public void go() {
    BlockingQueue<Integer> input = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Integer>();
    BlockingQueue<Integer> output = new ArrayBlockingQueue<Integer>();
    Thread runner1 = new Thread( createSum( input, output ) );
    Thread runner2 = new Thread( createSum( input, output ) );
    for( int i = 0; i < 10; i++ ) {
        input.put( random.nextInt() );
    }

    runner1.start();
    runner2.start();

    runner1.join();
    runner2.join();

    Integer result = 0;
    while( !output.isEmpty() ) {
        result += output.take();
    }
    System.out.println( result );
}

This solution only starts summing things after the queue is filled but in your solution it was doing the same thing.

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