Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
while (array[i] == null)

gives an incomparable types error.

I want to do the following:

  int i = 0;
  int[] array = new int[50];

  while (array[i] == null)
  {
     array[i] = console.nextInt();
     i++;
  }
share|improve this question
2  
What is array? Can a primitive have a null value? – Sotirios Delimanolis Mar 9 '14 at 23:40
1  
You will need to use Integer class for your array, if you have to have this loop. – PM 77-1 Mar 9 '14 at 23:41
    
@Sotirios: array is an array. What is a primitive? @PM: I declared the array as an int array. Is this what you mean? – thetypist Mar 9 '14 at 23:46
    
It's one of two Java value types. Look it up. – Sotirios Delimanolis Mar 9 '14 at 23:49
    
int[] array = int[50]; is completely wrong! You can't do that!! – S M Al Mamun Mar 9 '14 at 23:51
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason you cannot do this is because you have an array of primitive types. Primitive types must have a value in Java. This is because they are values, not references to objects.

An object such as an Integer, is a reference to a chunk of memory on the heap. It makes sense for that to not point to anything, thus it can be null.

In your case int[] array = int[50] (if it were syntactically correct), would never have a null element.

You're better off trying something like this:

int[] array = new int[50];

for(int k = 0; k < 50; k++)
{
   array[k] = console.nextInt();
}

It's much more idiomatic and anybody who reads your code will be happier with you.

If you try this, you'll get an index out of bounds error:

int i = 0;
Integer[] array = new Integer[50];

while (array[i] == null)
{
   array[i] = console.nextInt();
   i++;
}

So try this instead:

Integer[] array = new Integer[50];

for(int i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
{
   array[i] = console.nextInt();
}

If console is a Scanner, you should use:

int i = 0;
Integer[] array = new Integer[50];

while(console.hasNextInt() && i < 50)
{
   array[++i] = console.nextInt();
}
share|improve this answer
    
What should I do if I have 50 as a maximum number of inputted values by the user, but the user may enter less? How would I force those values into an array? – thetypist Mar 10 '14 at 0:15
    
I'd have to know more about what console is. Is it a Scanner. If so, that can't return a null value at all, so you'll have to use hasNextInt instead. – munk Mar 10 '14 at 0:26
    
Yes it is a Scanner. – thetypist Mar 10 '14 at 0:32

A primitive int cannot be null, hence the compiler error. Only object references can be nullable.

As PM 77-1 has suggested, you can instead declare an array of Integer objects. Integer is a wrapper class for the primitive int. It can be assigned a null value.

By default, all elements in your array are valued 0 immediately after instantiation if you are using the primitive int. If you are sure that your array should not contain values less than or equal to 0, you can use this check: if( array[k] <= 0 ) { ... }

Otherwise, I would recommend using usmcs's first suggested code block if you are sure that all values should be inputted by the user.

share|improve this answer
    
What should I do if I have 50 as a maximum number of inputted values by the user, but the user may enter less? How would I force those values into an array? – thetypist Mar 10 '14 at 0:14
1  
console.nextInt() should ensure the user inputs all 50 values. Otherwise, you'd have to assign default values to non-assigned elements in the array. See stackoverflow.com/questions/12487734/user-input-check-int-only – davecroman Mar 10 '14 at 0:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.