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What is the fastest way to find if a number is even or odd?

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1  
That's a good beginner's C question. +1 from me. –  t0mm13b Feb 9 '10 at 13:21
    
Isn't bitwise-XOR more faster than bitwise-AND? Is it not possible with XOR operation? –  aks Feb 9 '10 at 14:00
7  
@aks: If you are using a full function compiler, that back end almost certainly knows those tricks better than you do. Write for clarity and legibility and leave the bit fiddle, cycle optimization to the pro. Really. And if you're not happy with the results, profile, then examine the hot spots in detail. –  dmckee Feb 9 '10 at 14:05
    
@dmckee: Anyway I'd like to see a solution using only a single XOR statement. I don't think that's possible... –  AndiDog Feb 9 '10 at 14:59
1  
Make sure you've read this before microoptimization: linux-kongress.org/2009/slides/… –  LeakyCode Feb 9 '10 at 15:16
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11 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

It is pretty well known that

static inline int is_odd_A(int x) { return x & 1; }

is more efficient than

static inline int is_odd_B(int x) { return x % 2; }

But with the optimizer on, will is_odd_B be no different from is_odd_A? No — with gcc-4.2 -O2, we get, (in ARM assembly):

_is_odd_A:
    and r0, r0, #1
    bx  lr

_is_odd_B:
    mov r3, r0, lsr #31
    add r0, r0, r3
    and r0, r0, #1
    rsb r0, r3, r0
    bx  lr

We see that is_odd_B takes 3 more instructions than is_odd_A, the main reason is because

((-1) % 2) == -1
((-1) & 1) ==  1

However, all the following versions will generate the same code as is_odd_A:

#include <stdbool.h>
static inline bool is_odd_D(int x) { return x % 2; }      // note the bool
static inline int  is_odd_E(int x) { return x % 2 != 0; } // note the !=

What does this mean? The optimizer is usually sophisticated enough that, for these simple stuff, the clearest code is enough to guarantee best efficiency.

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3  
even better, specify the argument as unsigned. –  Potatoswatter Feb 9 '10 at 18:59
    
@Potatoswatter: x%2U or x&1U. :-) –  R.. Sep 21 '10 at 3:15
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bool is_odd = number & 1;
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1  
thats fast, but wont compile unless there's a typedef somewhere –  Tom Feb 9 '10 at 13:00
5  
This fails on a machine using one's complement. –  Jason Feb 9 '10 at 14:24
1  
@Jason: You're right of course, this implementation implies two's complement logic. I'm not aware of any contemporary one's complement hardware, however. If you know of any, please comment. –  digitalarbeiter Feb 9 '10 at 14:49
8  
As shown in other answers "% 2" is the "right" answer since it will compile to "& 1" on most hardware anyway, and it shows the correct intention of the code. "& 1" is from the days before more intelligent compiler optimizations. –  Jim Buck Feb 9 '10 at 14:51
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@Jason: it succeeds on a machine using ones complement if you change the 1 to 1U. –  R.. Sep 21 '10 at 3:16
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Usual way to do it:

int number = ...;
if(number % 2) { odd }
else { even }

Alternative:

int number = ...;
if(number & 1) { odd }
else { even }

Tested on GCC 3.3.1 and 4.3.2, both have about the same speed (without compiler optimization) as both result in the and instruction (compiled on x86) - I know that using the div instruction for modulo would be much slower, thus I didn't test it at all.

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The compiler has likely removed the test completely as the are both probably constant. Recall that gcc without options is equivalent to gcc -O2 which is a non-trivial level of speed optimization. Check the generated assembly to be sure.. –  dmckee Feb 9 '10 at 13:46
    
Isn't bitwise-XOR more faster than bitwise-AND? Is it not possible with XOR operation? –  aks Feb 9 '10 at 14:00
1  
@dmckee: I don't know why you think level 2 was the default. The man page clearly says "-O0 Do not optimize. This is the default.". But I checked the assembly code anyway and it was not removed from the code (that's why it takes 7 seconds for each test to run). –  AndiDog Feb 9 '10 at 14:14
    
@aks: I tested bitwise XOR and it's at the very same speed as AND/modulo (BTW these two produce the same code on x86, namely an "and" instruction). Anyway could you tell me how to determine odd/even with only an XOR statement? –  AndiDog Feb 9 '10 at 14:16
    
InRe optimization levels: Mea Cupla. –  dmckee Feb 9 '10 at 14:41
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if (x & 1) is true then it's odd, otherwise it's even.

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2  
This fails on a machine using one's complement. –  Jason Feb 9 '10 at 14:25
    
Also, and this is a general comment to all the answers to date, the question did not specify the number was an integer. You can't do bitwise operations on floats (at least, not without some type-casting hackery). –  Skizz Feb 9 '10 at 14:49
    
@Skizz: Define even or oddness for a non-integer. –  dmckee Feb 9 '10 at 15:10
    
@dmckee: float i=2.0f; // an even number! but i & 1 doesn't work. –  Skizz Feb 9 '10 at 19:55
    
@Skizz you can define it for 2.0 because it has an integer expression. So, the right thing to do is convert to int and handle the result as discussed. –  dmckee Feb 9 '10 at 20:24
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int i=5;
if ( i%2 == 0 )
{
   // Even
} else {
   // Odd
}
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Checking the least significant bit would be faster than the modulus operator. However, I bet most compilers would turn "mod 2" into "and 1" –  bramp Feb 9 '10 at 13:00
    
@bramp: they can't if i is signed. –  R.. Sep 21 '10 at 3:17
    
@R: are you sure? For example, the twos complement of 127 is "01111111", and -127 is "10000001", both have the least significant bit set. –  bramp Sep 21 '10 at 11:25
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If it's an integer, probably by just checking the least significant bit. Zero would be counted as even though.

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+1 Good one on zero. –  Tom Feb 9 '10 at 13:01
1  
Zero is an even number. This also fails on a machine using one's complement. –  Jason Feb 9 '10 at 14:24
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int is_odd(int n)
{
   if (n == 0)
      return 0;
   else if (n == 1)
      return 1;
   else
      return !is_odd(n - 1);
}

Oh wait, you said fastest way, not funniest. My bad ;)

Above function only works for positive numbers of course.

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3  
I would perform a prime factorization on n, then check whether it has any factors if 2. :p –  KennyTM Feb 9 '10 at 14:39
    
what about: int is_odd(int n) { return cos(M_PI * n) < 0.0; } –  e.tadeu Feb 9 '10 at 14:46
2  
A good compiler should output the same assembler as with {return n & 1;} :) –  static_rtti Feb 9 '10 at 15:02
    
It's a good test for compiler "goodness" –  e.tadeu Feb 9 '10 at 17:04
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The portable way is to use the modulus operator %:

if (x % 2 == 0) // number is even

If you know that you're only ever going to run on two's complement architectures, you can use a bitwise and:

if (x & 0x01 == 0) // number is even

Using the modulus operator can result in slower code relative to the bitwise and; however, I'd stick with it unless all of the following are true:

  1. You are failing to meet a hard performance requirement;
  2. You are executing x % 2 a lot (say in a tight loop that's being executed thousands of times);
  3. Profiling indicates that usage of the mod operator is the bottleneck;
  4. Profiling also indicates that using the bitwise-and relieves the bottleneck and allows you to meet the performance requirement.
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== has higher precedence than &, therefore x & 0x01 == 0 will evaluate into x & (0x01 == 0) which is equivalent to x & 0 which means 0 so your if branch will never be executed. –  KennyTM Feb 9 '10 at 15:01
    
Plus you should check if the compiler really outputs different machine code for the two. My bet is that it should output the same, especially with optimizations turned on. –  static_rtti Feb 9 '10 at 15:03
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Check to see if the last bit is 1.

int is_odd(int num) {
  return num & 1;
}
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See the comment of Tom, same applies here. This won't compile in C. –  AndiDog Feb 9 '10 at 14:22
    
Right... changed to int. (FWIW, some build environments #define or typedef bool to int). –  0xfe Feb 9 '10 at 14:54
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Check the least significant bit:

if (number & 0x01) {
  // It's odd
} else {
  // It's even
}
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Out of curiosity: Why 0x01 instead of simply 1? –  Joachim Sauer Feb 9 '10 at 14:41
    
It's habit. I'm used to always using hexadecimal representation when doing bitwise operations :) –  holygeek Feb 9 '10 at 14:46
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Your question is not completely specified. Regardless, the answer is dependent on your compiler and the architecture of your machine. For example, are you on a machine using one's complement or two's complement signed number representations?

I write my code to be correct first, clear second, concise third and fast last. Therefore, I would code this routine as follows:

/* returns 0 if odd, 1 if even */
/* can use bool in C99 */
int IsEven(int n) {
    return n % 2 == 0;
}

This method is correct, it more clearly expresses the intent than testing the LSB, it's concise and, believe it or not, it is blazing fast. If and only if profiling told me that this method were a bottleneck in my application would I consider deviating from it.

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@unwind: I'm pretty sure there is, and has been for more than 10 years (since C99) –  static_rtti Feb 9 '10 at 15:03
    
@UpvoteRemover: What gives? –  Jason Feb 9 '10 at 15:39
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