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I need to write a program that get a sentence and split its words by a delimiter(space);so I've wrote the code below but it doesn't seem to be working properly. any idea's how to debug this code? thanks in advance for your help. here's what I come up with so far:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
const int BUFFER_SIZE=255;


int main()
{       
       char* buffer;
       buffer=new char[255];
       cout<<"enter a statement:"<<endl;
    cin.getline(buffer,BUFFER_SIZE);
    int q=0, numofwords=1;
    while(buffer[q] != '\0'){
        if(buffer[q]==' ') numofwords ++;
        q ++;
    }
    char** wordsArray;
    wordsArray= new char* [numofwords];  

    int lenofeachword=0, num=0;
    int* sizeofwords=new int [numofwords];
    for(int i=0;i<q;i++){
        if(buffer[i]==' ')
        {
            sizeofwords[num]=lenofeachword;
            wordsArray[num]=new char[lenofeachword];
            num++; 
        }else{
        lenofeachword++;
        }



    }
    sizeofwords[num]=lenofeachword;  
    wordsArray[num]=new char[lenofeachword]; 
    int k=0;
    for(int i=0; i<numofwords;i++){

        for(int j=0;j<sizeofwords[i];j++)
        {
            wordsArray[i][j]=buffer[k];
            k++;

        }
        k++;
    }

   for(int i=0; i<numofwords;i++){

            for(int j=0;j<sizeofwords[i];j++)
            {
                cout<<wordsArray[i][j];

            }
        cout<<endl;

        }
 }
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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Mar 10 at 7:26

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
In C++ you should be using std::string and std::vector for dynamically allocated storage. Using new and delete is considered very bad style as it's prone to memory leaks. –  Jan Hudec Mar 10 at 7:07

2 Answers 2

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    int size, j;
    char s[1005];
    gets(s);
    scanf("%d", &size);
    j=0;
    for(int i=size; i<strlen(s); i+=size) {
        for(; j<i; j++) {
            printf("%c", s[j]);
        }
        printf(" ");
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
-1 for using C library where type-safe C++ functionality exists. –  Jan Hudec Mar 10 at 7:01
    
@JanHudec you think so. then, can you pls show us how to read whole sentence "type-safe"-ly in C++ –  garakchy Mar 10 at 19:35
1  
Use std::getline for getting the line from std::istream (that is different from std::istream::getline, unfortunately) and then either again std::getline from std::stringstream or iterate over the std::string, looking for spaces with it's find method. –  Jan Hudec Mar 10 at 19:51
    
@JanHudec thanx. but thats so long and complexive to me. i just prefer c-style and gets(), though i know its depreciated. its less line and less code –  garakchy Mar 10 at 19:54
    
It is neither longer nor more complex and you don't get a buffer overrun. –  Jan Hudec Mar 10 at 22:07

You forgot to assign zero to lenofeachword after you deretmine lenght of a word. And if int main(), you should return an int value.

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