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I would like to konw if there is any function in R that allows to estimate the df of a multivariate t distribution.

The problem is easy: I have a matrix of 5 variables (columns) with 75 observations (rows). I would like to estimate the df of a multivariate t on that sample.

Thanks,

Juan.

***Edition: after fabians suggestions I implemented the dmvt() formula****

# "residuals" is a matrix with residuals from a model. I want to estimate the df of  
# that sample assuming multivariate-t

sigma<-cor(residuals, use="pairwise.complete.obs", method="pearson")
my_means<-vector(length = 8)

for (i in 1:8){
  my_means[i]<-mean(my_matrix[,i]) 
}

residuals.scaled<-scale(residuals)
df.1 <-dmvt(residuals.scaled, my_means, sigma, log= FALSE, type = "shifted", df = 1)

I have some doubts regarding: 1) Scaling: I'm also centering the data. Don't know if this is correct. 2) Using log = FALSE as I don't know why densities should be given as log(d) in my case 3) From here I should estimate the likehood of the sample data for each df. Thus, more code lines like df.2, df.3, etc should be added and then calculate the likelihood of each. Then, choose the highest. Is that correct?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Package mvtnorm supplies the density of a (shifted) multivariate t-distribution in function dmvt. You could enter your (scaled) data and its sample correlation and compute the likelihood of your data for different values of df. Pick the value of dfthat maximizes the likelihood of your data.

EDIT:

library(mvtnorm)
set.seed(12121212)
################################################################################
## simulate n vectors of p-dim. t-distributed data in matrix X:
n <- 300
p <- 8

# draw random column means
means <- 10 * rnorm(p)

# correlation is AR(1) with correlation rho=.8
rho <- 0.8
sigma <- rho ^ abs(outer(1:p, 1:p, "-"))

# column s.d.s are sqrt(1:8)
df <- 3
X <- t(t(rmvt(n, sigma=sigma, delta=means, df=df)) * sqrt(1:8))


################################################################################
# evaluate t-likelihood for scaled X:

X_scale <- scale(X)
sigma_est <- cor(X_scale)

df_candidates <- seq(1, 20, by=2)
loglik <- numeric(length(df_candidates))
names(loglik) <- df_candidates
for(df in df_candidates){
    # no need for delta since we're working on scaled & centered data.
    # use sum(log(likelihood)), not prod(likelihood) to avoid numeric over/underflow 
    loglik[as.character(df)] <- sum(dmvt(x=X_scale, sigma=sigma_est, 
                                         df=df, log=TRUE))
}
loglik
#        1         3         5         7         9        11        13 
#-1788.219 -1756.301 -1768.885 -1783.724 -1797.386 -1809.556 -1820.382 
#       15        17        19 
#-1830.066 -1838.788 -1846.698 
## --> maximal for df=3, as used for the simulation.

## verify that mean shift can be incorporated into pre-processing as above:
dmvt(X[1,], delta=means) == dmvt(X[1,] - means)
#[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! What do you mean by scaled data? –  user2794659 Mar 10 at 9:40
    
Mutlivariate data will typically have different amounts of variation in each dimension (i.e, the variances in each of your columns will likely be different). The multivariate t-distribution as implemented in mvtnorm does not accomodate that, so you need to scale the columns of your data matrix (see ?scale) to have the same variance before using dmvt(), otherwise the different scales between the columns will influence the result for the df. –  fabians Mar 10 at 10:02
    
That was very helpful! In the inputs of dvt(): it says that "x" is a vector or matrix of quantiles. What does it mean? Is "delta" the vector of means? should I use type = "shifted"? Thanks! –  user2794659 Mar 10 at 11:13
    
" 'x' is a vector or matrix of quantiles" is just a fancy way of saying that those are the values you want to evaluate the multivariate t-density for. delta is the vector of (column)-means, yes. type="shifted" seems to be what you would typically want. –  fabians Mar 10 at 11:27
    
Thanks for your help @fabians (after this comment the question was edited). –  user2794659 Mar 10 at 13:36

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