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I have just switched to c# from c++. I have already done some task in c++ and the same now i have to translate in c#.

I am going through some problems.

I have to find the frequency of symbols in binary files (which is taken as sole argument, so don't know it's size/length).(these frequency will be further used to create huffman tree).

My code to do that in c++ is below :

My structure is like this:

struct Node     
{    
    unsigned int symbol;
    int freq;    
    struct Node * next,  * left, * right;  
};
Node * tree;

And how i read the file is like this :

FILE * fp;
fp = fopen(argv, "rb");
ch = fgetc(fp);

while (fread( & ch, sizeof(ch), 1, fp)) {
    create_frequency(ch);
}

fclose(fp);

Could any one please help me in translating the same in c# (specially this binary file read procedure to create frequency of symbols and storing in linked list)? Thanks for the help

Edit: Tried to write the code according to what Henk Holterman explained below but still there is error and the error is :

error CS1501: No overload for method 'Open' takes '1' arguments
/usr/lib/mono/2.0/mscorlib.dll (Location of the symbol related to previous error)
shekhar_c#.cs(22,32): error CS0825: The contextual keyword 'var' may only appear within a local variable declaration
Compilation failed: 2 error(s), 0 warnings

And my code to do this is:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // using provides exception-safe closing
    using (var fp = System.IO.File.Open(args))
    {
        int b; // note: not a byte
        while ((b = fp.Readbyte()) >= 0)
        {
            byte ch = (byte) b;
            // now use the byte in 'ch'
            //create_frequency(ch);
        }
    }
 }

And the line corresponding to the two errors is :

using (var fp = System.IO.File.Open(args))

could some one please help me ? I am beginner to c#

share|improve this question
    
OK, my mistake(s). Try fp = System.IO.File.OpenRead(args[1]) –  Henk Holterman Mar 10 '14 at 12:34
    
@HenkHolterman error CS1061: Type System.IO.FileStream' does not contain a definition for Readbyte' and no extension method Readbyte' of type System.IO.FileStream' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Sss Mar 10 '14 at 12:48
1  
The function is ReadByte, not Readbyte. –  Jim Mischel Mar 10 '14 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
string fileName = ...
using (var fp = System.IO.File.OpenRead(fileName)) // using provides exception-safe closing
{
    int b; // note: not a byte

    while ((b = fp.ReadByte()) >= 0)
    {
        byte ch = (byte) b;
        // now use the byte in 'ch'
        create_frequency(ch);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but in c++ code i had used "argv" which is taken from main and is like this "int main(int argc, char ** argv)" . I mean it has double pointers but we cant use * in c# . so how this argv work in c# ? and second question do i have to pass this "ch" in my create_freq()function to create node? –  Sss Mar 10 '14 at 10:29
1  
For me as a C# programmer, could you please explain why you use an int b (and even comment "not a byte")? And why do you comment node: not a byte without explaining why? –  Thorsten Dittmar Mar 10 '14 at 10:29
    
@user234839 - You were not to specific about where the filename comes from, C++'s argv[1] would be args[0] in C#. As long as it's a string. –  Henk Holterman Mar 10 '14 at 10:46
1  
@ThorstenDittmar - it's funny but the method named ReadByte() actually returns an int. So that the special value -1 can be used for EOF. This answer gives the basic pattern to deal with that encoding. –  Henk Holterman Mar 10 '14 at 10:47
    
@HenkHolterman Thanks! I never noticed that, as I never used ReadByte in real life. I rather use Read to read an entire buffer. –  Thorsten Dittmar Mar 10 '14 at 10:54

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